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CAVALIER I No. 96 | GRKA-TEK | Slate

Product Code: ZZGGB096

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Product Features

  • 18" x 10" x 9"
  • Dual Top Handles With 6” Drop
  • Adjustable Shoulder Strap 47"
  • Shoulder Strap Drop 12”
    • Fold end design allows wide top opening for ease of packing
      • Inside zippered pocket
        • Meets airlines standards as a carry-on
          • To attach the strap unhook the clips at the ends of the zipper tabs that are hooked onto the d-rings at the base of the bag.
            • Then, hook the clip of the shoulder strap ends onto those clips (at the zipper tab ends)

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Product Description

For the traveler we all aspire to be: adventurous, elegant, innovative. Our most compact duffel bag from our Cavalier series features fold-end design that opens to allow extra room and ease in packing. Ends secure with brass shackles. A great gym bag or small carry-on bag perfect for overnight travels. Made from rich chestnut leather, this designer duffel bag is both functional and sophisticated.

Product Specifications

  • 18" x 10" x 9"
  • Dual Top Handles With 6” Drop
  • Adjustable Shoulder Strap 47"
  • Shoulder Strap Drop 12”
    • Fold end design allows wide top opening for ease of packing
      • Inside zippered pocket
        • Meets airlines standards as a carry-on
          • To attach the strap unhook the clips at the ends of the zipper tabs that are hooked onto the d-rings at the base of the bag.
            • Then, hook the clip of the shoulder strap ends onto those clips (at the zipper tab ends)

Stories

Great Drives: Harriman State Park

While the City may get all of the fame, the greater state of New York is not without its treasures, amongst them its 179 state parks. Harriman State Park’s 46,000 acres make it the state’s second largest, and while well known as a destination for camping, hiking, mountain biking and other outdoor pursuits, Harriman is also home to some of the greatest driving roads to be found anywhere in the country. Just 45 miles outside of Manhattan, the park is an easily accessible automotive playground, and one could easily spend a full day navigating its wide array of hills, hairpins, and switchbacks. As it is a popular destination with nature lovers - particularly on the weekends - it’s best to hit the park when it’s emptier.  Early in the m...
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While the City may get all of the fame, the greater state of New York is not without its treasures, amongst them its 179 state parks. Harriman State Park’s 46,000 acres make it the state’s second largest, and while well known as a destination for camping, hiking, mountain biking and other outdoor pursuits, Harriman is also home to some of the greatest driving roads to be found anywhere in the country. Just 45 miles outside of Manhattan, the park is an easily accessible automotive playground, and one could easily spend a full day navigating its wide array of hills, hairpins, and switchbacks. As it is a popular destination with nature lovers - particularly on the weekends - it’s best to hit the park when it’s emptier.  Early in the morning or off season are the best times, though we’ve been known to play hooky on particularly nice days in the fall just to have a few hours with those glorious roads to ourselves. The easiest way to get to Harriman State Park is via the George Washington Bridge. Take the upper roadway, then exit right just after the bridge ends to pick up the Palisades Parkway. The Parkway itself is a beautiful drive - tree lined with sloping curves and great vantages of the Hudson River. But do obey the speed limits, as radar guns are always out in force. Don’t fret though. Your restraint will soon be rewarded. After 30 miles on the Palisades Parkway you’ll take a lefthand exit at Exit 16, following the signs towards Lake Welch/Sebago Beach. Soon you’ll find yourself on Tiorati Brook Road, and this is where your fun begins. That yellow diamond-shaped sign warning you of curves ahead? It’s not kidding. Though only 3.6 miles, Tiorati Brook is a seemingly nonstop run of white knuckle hairpins, a challenging treat for both driver and suspension. Tiorati Brook Road ends at Tiorati Circle, a roundabout at the base of Lake Tiorati which is a popular spot for picnickers and somewhere you’ll probably stop to snap a photo. Like much of the park, it’s postcard perfect. At the circle you’ll have the choice of taking Seven Lakes Drive in either direction, or bearing off onto Arden Valley Road. You’ll take all three. Start by following Seven Lakes Drive along the shore of Lake Tiorati. Seven Lakes is a beautiful road, not as technically challenging as Tiorati Brook, but incredibly scenic with smooth flat pavement, gentle curves, and elevation changes that will get you off your front two wheels if you hit them just right. Stay on Seven Lakes Drive going straight through the roundabout (though Kanawuke road can be a fun detour) and eventually it will dead-end onto NY 17, a magnificent road in its own right. Instead you’ll pull a quick U-turn and head back down Seven Lakes towards Tiorati Circle. Now when you hit the roundabout, you’ll want to take Arden Valley Road, which will be to your left. While Tiorati Brook and Seven Lakes are well groomed and fairly gentle, Arden Valley is far from that. It’s a snarling route of teeth chattering broken pavement, blind turns, and exposed tree branches that your passenger will hate and your inner rally car driver will love. Arden Valley also ends at NY 17, at which point you’ll spin around and attack it again from the opposite direction. Once you reach the roundabout again you’ll be loving the adrenaline rush the curves provided but wishing for a smoother road, which is why it’s a perfect time for one more back and forth run down Tiorati Brook Road, which now lays directly in front of you across the roundabout. Once back to the circle you’ll take Seven Lakes in the opposite direction of your first run, exiting right this time. Seven Lakes Drive will take you over the Hudson River across the Bear Mountain Bridge, where you’ll pick up 9A along the river. Take 9A to the Saw Mill River Parkway, another of our favorite roads, that will give you a perfect last bit of driving pleasure before it takes you right back into Manhattan via the West Side Highway. Give yourself around 4 hours for the full round trip, and several more days for the grin to subside. Stash your weekend drive essentials - camera, hiking boots, snacks and more, in the rugged Cavalier I.        
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Best of Both Worlds: Backdated Porsche 911s

In the pantheon of sports cardom, there is perhaps no single model more iconic than Porsche’s legendary 911. Much of this can be attributed to the fact that the 911 has been the 911 for so long- 50 years as of 2013 in fact. It’s a single nameplate sportscar run bested only by Chevrolet’s Corvette, the main difference being that most every generation of the 911, every “evolution” as the folks in Stuttgart like to call them, has been praised as nearly perfect. The basic platform and shape of the 911 has remained essentially unchanged, a long hooded, bubble backed 2+2 with flat six engine hanging beyond the rear axle, giving an unbalanced weigh ratio that makes handling terrifying to the uninitiated and sublime to those that hav...
read full story
In the pantheon of sports cardom, there is perhaps no single model more iconic than Porsche’s legendary 911. Much of this can be attributed to the fact that the 911 has been the 911 for so long- 50 years as of 2013 in fact. It’s a single nameplate sportscar run bested only by Chevrolet’s Corvette, the main difference being that most every generation of the 911, every “evolution” as the folks in Stuttgart like to call them, has been praised as nearly perfect. The basic platform and shape of the 911 has remained essentially unchanged, a long hooded, bubble backed 2+2 with flat six engine hanging beyond the rear axle, giving an unbalanced weigh ratio that makes handling terrifying to the uninitiated and sublime to those that have mastered it. Advances have been made along the way, with each new evolution offering increased power and updated technology, but any Porsche 911, regardless of the year it was made, is instantly and unmistakably a 911. The cult of Porsche is strong and global, and collectors, voting with their dollars, have made it clear that two generations of 911s are considered superior to all the others. One is the model known internally as the 993, produced from 1994 to 1998 and heralded as being “the last of the air cooled” as Porsche moved to water cooled engines in their next evolution, known as the 996. The ultimate version of the 993, the Turbo S, now trades hands for north of $200k, creeping into the territory of the most valuable regularly produced 911, the infamous 1973 Carrera 2.7 RS. The other is the very first iteration of the 911, produced from 1963 until 1973. These are known in the Porsche community as a “longnose” since safety regulations in 1974 required Porsche to add external bumpers on the front and rear, shortening the length of the hood to accommodate them. These early 911s, admired for the beauty of their simplicity have become prized amongst collectors, with the price of entry tripling over the last ten years, from $20k+ to $60k+ for a decent runner. The only issue with these first 911s is that as they didn’t benefit from the advances in engineering applied to the later cars- they simply weren’t as good from a technical standpoint. Nostalgic and attractive yes, but from a practical standpoint, anti-lock brakes, power steering, better suspension, improved transmissions, and increases in horsepower genuinely made for a better car. The ideal 911 to many then would be the lines and looks of a longnose, with all of the upgrades of more modern models. This was exactly the thought process of a handful of capable enthusiasts. If the 911 chassis had essentially been the same all along, couldn’t a newer car be made to look older? After all, Porsche owners for years had been doing just the opposite, adding aftermarket body panels to the frames of older 911s to make them look like the newest models, and a quick scan of eBay motors will easily find you several 70’s and 80’s era 911s made to look like they were from the 90’s. The concept of taking cars from the 80’s and 90’s and “backdating” them to look like Porsches from the 60’s is a newer one, but one that’s quickly gained traction. The most visible of these conversions come from the shop of former rock musician Rob Dickinson’s Singer Vehicle Designs, whose “reminagined” 911s begin life as 1989-1994 964 model car before being stripped of their body panels, as well as nearly everything else, and being rebuilt as the ultimate interpretation of a longnose 911. Singer takes backdating and customization to the extreme, spending close to 4,000 hours of labor on each car. The eye-popping results have a price tag to match, oft ending up in the $300k+ range. But for those with a more realistic budget, backyard backdates can be achieved for significantly less. These generally begin as cars from the 1974-1983 era, which can be readily found for under twenty grand. All body panels other than the doors are removed, replaced with modified steel or fiberglass replicas of the original longnose parts from a growing number of small manufacturers that specialize in crafting them. The parts themselves are not terribly expensive, with the majority of the effort being in the labor of perfectly matching the original lines. But even those who wish to farm the work out to a qualified body shop can attain a basic backdated 911 with the sex appeal of the early cars and the safety and performance of later ones for a grand total of less than thirty thousand dollars. While purists may scoff at these “Frankenstein” Porsches, those with a real passion for driving can’t get enough. Just ask Achim Anscheidt, the man who designed the mighty Bugatti Veyron, the $1.2 million dollar supercar touted as the fastest in the world. His daily driver is a backdated ’81 911. We happen to be huge fans of them as well. Proven performers with rugged reliability and classic lines are the same traits we strive for when handcrafting our Express Series of bags, a pair of which happen to fit perfectly in the trunk.
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Ghurka Features

  • Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.

  • Our Leather

    learn more

    show less

    Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    learn more

    show less

    The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    learn more

    show less

    The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    learn more

    show less

    The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.