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CHEF'S KNIFE ROLL No. 246

Product Code: ZZITA246

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Product Features

  • Holds eight knives
    • Closed: 17" x 7" Opened: 27" x 17"
      • Inside zippered pocket for extra accessories
        • Coated twill for extra protection

Product Tags

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Product Description

Boldly facing the culinary world with luxury and charm, our Knife Roll is exquisitely detailed to ensure both strong, practical use and beautiful, off-duty transport. On its exterior, the Knife Roll is wrapped in supple, French calfskin leather and is secured with signature, post and tab closures. On its interior, the sleek roll unwinds to showcase a multi-faceted landscape, complete with eight singular knife compartments, suede top flap, and smart side zip designed for small accessories. United, our sleek Knife Roll readies any chef for a Michelin star experience.

Product Specifications

  • Holds eight knives
    • Closed: 17" x 7" Opened: 27" x 17"
      • Inside zippered pocket for extra accessories
        • Coated twill for extra protection

Stories

Found on the Sound: The Barteca Restaurants

With a manufacturing home-base in southeastern Connecticut for the past 40 years, you can imagine that we've become quite familiar with the culinary scene in Fairfield county. While not the foodie paradise of the metropolis to our south, we've been quite content with the classic New England seafood stalwarts and old-world Italian establishments that have dominated the Constitution State's east coast for as long as anyone can remember. That was until Barteca Restaurant Group's Sasa Mahr-Batuz and Andy Pforzheimer entered the game. The celebrated chefs, world travelers, and bon vivants knew there was an appetite for something more daring along the affluent Metro North Ne...
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With a manufacturing home-base in southeastern Connecticut for the past 40 years, you can imagine that we've become quite familiar with the culinary scene in Fairfield county. While not the foodie paradise of the metropolis to our south, we've been quite content with the classic New England seafood stalwarts and old-world Italian establishments that have dominated the Constitution State's east coast for as long as anyone can remember. That was until Barteca Restaurant Group's Sasa Mahr-Batuz and Andy Pforzheimer entered the game. The celebrated chefs, world travelers, and bon vivants knew there was an appetite for something more daring along the affluent Metro North New Haven corridor. If you've poked around the area at all, you may have taken note. That sexy Malibu-meets-Tulum “taco villa” on the water in Westport? Theirs. The raucous James Beard-winning tapas spot with the open kitchen and a $15,000 Berkel Jamon Serrano slicer? Also theirs. With a handy assist from Culinary Director Adam Halberg, the duo has served up some of the most exciting dining experiences to hit the tri-state area in the past five years. Let's start with Barcelona, the group's flagship enterprise an unassuming, award-winning Spanish and Mediterranean eatery offering the finest small plates of fresh seafood, grilled meats, and Mangialica and Patanegra varieties on the market. Cut on the world class Berkel slicer, the experience of ordering up a plate is one to be savored. On a recent visit to the Greenwich location, Executive Chef and Le Cirque and Joel Robuchon veteran Michael Lucente schooled us on the process. While the kitchen delivers straight culinary prowess, the bar and wait staff is another force to be reckoned with. The wine list, developed by Wine & Spirits Director Gretchen Thomas (and expertly poured by the fearless Brandon at the bar) features the largest selections of Spanish, Portuguese, and South American wines in America. www.distcalc.info And the service team's knowledge of Galician dining is unparalleled. This is no accident. Batuz and Pforzheimer make it a point to take all staff members from chefs to servers to managers on six-day culinary tours of the menu's motherland; wine tasting in Valencia, tapas sampling in Madrid and Cuenca, and produce education on the farms of the Spanish countryside. These epic tasting journeys not only familiarize the team with the region, the landscape, and the ingredients, but reinforce the customs of Mediterranean hospitality: the art of casual repasts, unhurried meals, the feeling that you're dining with family. The goal is to deliver an authentic experience for patrons back home. These adventurous restaurateurs want to do away with what General Manager Mike Gleason calls the “technical aspects of fine dining that infect staff in the US.” Amazing? There is more. The team behind Barcelona recently launched a new concept with their Bartaco collection of restaurants: a cheerful, surf lodge inspired taco eatery that doubles as the best bar scene on the Long Island Sound. The four-outpost collection delivers to Connecticut the best of many worlds delicious, freshly prepared, and reasonably priced small dishes, and a beautiful environment filled with beautiful people. What more can you ask for in the middle of a trying New England winter than some surfboards and a killer Michelada? We may not have Baja, but we have Bartaco. BARCELONA LOCATIONS Fairfield, CT Greenwich, CT New Haven, CT South Norwalk, CT Stamford, CT West Hartford, CT Atlanta, GA Brookline, MA Washington, DC BARTACO CT LOCATIONS Westport, CT Stamford, CT West Hartford, CT Port Chester, NY Very special thanks to Ria Rueda on the Barteca team for her help with this article. Ria, that was an evening we won't soon forget! In this story: No. 169 Office
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Burger Kings: Ghurka Visits Louis Lunch

  One day in the year 1900 a man dashed into a small New Haven luncheonette and asked for a quick meal that he could eat on the run. Louis Lassen, the establishment’s owner, hurriedly sandwiched a broiled beef patty between two slices of bread and sent the customer on his way, so the story goes, with America's first Hamburger.” This is the story shared with us by Jeff Lassen, fourth-generation owner of Louis Lunch, the legendary eatery made famous by the incident above. Over a Birch Beer, and with the charming salt-of-the-earth spirit only a true New Englander could tell a story, Lassen shared the landmark’s humble beginn...
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  One day in the year 1900 a man dashed into a small New Haven luncheonette and asked for a quick meal that he could eat on the run. Louis Lassen, the establishment’s owner, hurriedly sandwiched a broiled beef patty between two slices of bread and sent the customer on his way, so the story goes, with America's first Hamburger.” This is the story shared with us by Jeff Lassen, fourth-generation owner of Louis Lunch, the legendary eatery made famous by the incident above. Over a Birch Beer, and with the charming salt-of-the-earth spirit only a true New Englander could tell a story, Lassen shared the landmark’s humble beginnings as a horse-drawn lunch wagon in 1895. Twenty years later, the cart selling steak and potatoes found a permanent home on the corner of George and Temple Streets, in the shade of the Yale University campus. There, nestled in a tiny former tannery the size of most people's carports, sat what Lassen calls a little bite of history. Nestled, that was, until New Haven's urban renewal movement of the 1960’s and 70’s threatened Louis Lunch with the development of a high rise in its location. As fate would have it, the story of the impending tear-down was published by the Tampa Times. Upon reading this, a Florida woman contacted the Lassens and offered up a small parcel of land she owned at Crown and College Streets as an alternative location. One week before the demolition was scheduled to take place, Louis’ Lunch had found a new home. With community support the edifice was lifted off its foundation and relocated to its current site. Lassen’s father Ken successfully petitioned for landmark status in 1965 and added a small extension to the building using bricks that had been collected from all the demolished mom-and-pop establishments that hadn’t been so lucky. Today these bricks, and others that have been donated from all over the world, make up the walls of the dining area, the newest of which was received from Benjamin Franklin’s gravesite. Now about the food. In classic Connecticut style, Louis’ Lunch keeps it simple and straightforward. Burgers tomatoes, cheese, or onions only on toasted white bread, no condiments, period. But trust us, this is all you need. One bite of Lassen’s burger confirmed this. The proprietary blend of five meats, ground daily on site, and cooked in original century-old cast iron grills (only 9 at a time) is the only secret the purist Lassen claims to keep. “It’s all about the meat.” New Haveners would agree; it’s not unusual to see a crowd waiting up to an hour for one of the deftly grilled patties, though the average is 5-15 minutes. Potato salads and pies are made by Jeff’s mom and wife, and the employees are all friends and family, shared “Paul”, a Louis' Lunch vet of twenty years. When asked about the lack of Coca Cola, Lassed explains matter-of-factly that during the Great Depression his great grandfather called Coke for a refill and was priced out (it was selling on the black market for exorbitant prices) so he moved to Pepsi products. Currently you can get Foxcon Park sodas, Snapple teas, and Pepsi. “How do you know when the burger is ready?” was our last question to the ever-patient Jeff. “Practice,” he says.,  Well, the Lassens certainly have had enough of that. Visit Louis' Lunch and explore the Yale campus like a native with the, Blazer Backpack. Louis Lunch 261-263 Crown Street New Haven, CT 06510 (203) 562-5507 www.louislunch.com      
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Hog Heaven: Jamon Iberico de Bellota

Delicacies. We must admit we’ve got a soft spot for them. Though as with most things that are rare and desirable, they tend not to come cheap. Yet, when the occasion calls for it, we can understand spending several hundred dollars on a great bottle of wine, or perhaps a bit of truffle or caviar. But twelve hundred dollars for ham? At that rate, it better be hands down the greatest ham on the entire planet- which is exactly what jamon iberico de bellota is. Most carnivorous gourmands will have at least a passing familiarity with jamon iberico, a cured ham that is oft considered Spain’s answer to Italy’s famed Prosciutto di Parma. Jamon iberico, also known as “pata negra” for the distinctive black hoof of the ...
read full story
Delicacies. We must admit we’ve got a soft spot for them. Though as with most things that are rare and desirable, they tend not to come cheap. Yet, when the occasion calls for it, we can understand spending several hundred dollars on a great bottle of wine, or perhaps a bit of truffle or caviar. But twelve hundred dollars for ham? At that rate, it better be hands down the greatest ham on the entire planet- which is exactly what jamon iberico de bellota is. Most carnivorous gourmands will have at least a passing familiarity with jamon iberico, a cured ham that is oft considered Spain’s answer to Italy’s famed Prosciutto di Parma. Jamon iberico, also known as “pata negra” for the distinctive black hoof of the pigs that supply it, is similar to Champagne or Bordeaux in that true examples can only be produced in a specific region- in this case the southwestern corner of Spain, near the Portuguese border. The pigs themselves must be of the Black Iberian variety, a dark, nearly hairless breed with a genetic propensity to get very, very fat. And the majority of their short lives are spent doing just that. From birth the pigs are fed a regular diet of corn and grain, and then allowed to roam the Spanish countryside foraging grasses and roots, and generally weigh two hundred plus pounds after the first year. This is the end of the line for a pig destined for your “normal” jamon iberico, which sells for a comparatively paltry fifty dollars a pound. But for those pigs destined to be jamon iberica de bellota, this is where the transformation begins that will end up with a meat commanding twice the price. In the early fall, these chosen pigs begin are released into oak forests called dehesas where they will feed for four to six months. During this period, known as the Montanera, the pigs will gain up to a pound and a half a day, eventually doubling in weight. Their diet during this time consists of one thing and one thing only; the bellota, or acorn. These acorns are also the reason that the meat of these particular pigs become so special. After slaughter, referred to by Spanish farmers as the sacrifice, the front and hindquarters are packed in sea salt and after a few weeks, hung to cure. The curing process usually takes at least three years, during which the high dose of antioxidants from the acorns turns the layers of fat within the muscle to oleic acid, the “good” type of fat most regularly associated with olive oils. The result is meat that melts in the mouth, almost sweet at first with earthy afternotes of the acorn. Most of the fat that does not become oleic acid melts away during the extended in curing and the final result is a dark red, almost purple ham with elaborate golden marbling, which is served sliced thin and always cut by hand. It can also claim the title of the only pork that may actually be good for you, shown to lower harmful cholesterols. Until recently, those here in the United States who wished to sample the world’s most decadent ham had to embark on a journey or turn to the black market- the USDA outlawed the importation of jamon iberico until December 2007, with the first bellota varieties arriving the following year. Nowadays, it is accessible to most anyone with a cultured palate and deep pockets. In New York, it is a regular menu item at restaurants like Pata Negra and Boqueria, or can be purchased at Spanish speclalty market Despana or online anywhere from latienda.com. While twelve hundred dollars may still seem an outlandish price to pay for a ham, you’ll realize after one bite that it is truly something spectacular. And at roughly the same price and with similar care in creation, our handcrafted chestnut leather Examiner no. 5 which will last you a lifetime and beyond is practically a bargain.
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Ghurka Features

  • Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.

  • Our Leather

    learn more

    show less

    Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    learn more

    show less

    The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    learn more

    show less

    The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    learn more

    show less

    The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.