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HARD SUNGLASS CASE No. 251

Product Code: ZZSPA251

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Product Features

  • 7" x 1.5" x 3"
  • Top flap with brass button closure
  • Scratch free protection

Product Tags

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Product Description

A classic leather accessory with vintage charm and modern appeal, our Sunglass Case expertly bridges the gap between form and function. The Sunglass Case is finished through Ghurka's signature leather processing for a promise of ageless beauty and a perfect patina no matter how long it has been in use. Beneath the classic, top flap with brass button closure, the interior of the hard case is also lined with vintage black leather for a uniform look of scratch-free protection.

Product Specifications

  • 7" x 1.5" x 3"
  • Top flap with brass button closure
  • Scratch free protection

Stories

Driving Tunes: Creedence Clearwater Revival

Our neverending quest for adventure means that we’re great fans of the roadtrip. Whether a quick weekend getaway or a trek across countries, exploring the open road is one of our favorite ways to spend our time. There are a number of ingredients to the perfect roadtrip-the right car, the right company, the right route, the right destination, and the right music. As to the latter, we are constantly in search of what we consider “perfect albums.” Albums which, from beginning to end, don’t contain a single bad song. They’re rare to find, which makes them worth noting. Our first perfect album is Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Chronicle. Granted, a greatest hits compilation is cheating slightly, but putting together a c...
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Our neverending quest for adventure means that we’re great fans of the roadtrip. Whether a quick weekend getaway or a trek across countries, exploring the open road is one of our favorite ways to spend our time. There are a number of ingredients to the perfect roadtrip-the right car, the right company, the right route, the right destination, and the right music. As to the latter, we are constantly in search of what we consider “perfect albums.” Albums which, from beginning to end, don’t contain a single bad song. They’re rare to find, which makes them worth noting. Our first perfect album is Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Chronicle. Granted, a greatest hits compilation is cheating slightly, but putting together a collection of 20 tracks without a turkey in the bunch is no mean feat, particularly for a band that only released music for four years. , Creedence has a unique sound which is a bit hard to describe- critics often use the terms “swamp rock” or “Southern rock”- though the bands roots are solidly in the San Francsico bay area. Reagardless of what you label it, one thing is undeniable- this is great driving music. The album opens with the drum beat and guitar licks of their cover of Dale Hawkins’ “Suzy Q” and follows with another cover, this one Screaming Jay Hawkins’ “I Put A Spell On You”. The 20 songs on Chronicle are arranged in the order of which they were released by the band, so these two opening covers serve to show the music that would inspire the originals to follow- bluesy, grungy tracks driven by the drums and guitar, the type of songs that find you tapping out the beat on the steering wheel and laying on the throttle just a little more. The remainder of the album, save for an epic 11 minute cover of Norman Whitfield’s “I Heard It Though The Grapevine” which in shorter forms was also a hit for Gladys Knight & The Pips and Marvin Gaye, was written completely John Fogerty. While the other members included Fogerty’s brother Tom on rhythm guitar and backing vocals, Stu Cooke on bass, and Doug Clifford on drums, CCR was very much lead singer and guitarist John Fogerty’s band. The tracks range from quintessential road songs “Lodi” and “Traveling Band” and politically charged “Fortunate Son” and “Run Through The Jungle” both inspired by Fogerty’s time in the Army- to ballads “Long As I Can See The Light”, “Have You Ever Seen The Rain”, and “Someday Never Comes”. CCR’s first original single and the album’s third song “Proud Mary” would later be covered by more than a hundred artists, most notably Ike and Tina Turner, and fast paced scorchers like “Bad Moon Rising”, “Commotion”, and “Sweet Hitchhiker” display four California boys giving a more authentic display of Southern tinged Rock N’ Roll than most bands born below the Mason Dixon could muster. Any of these songs would stand up on their own, but the collection as a whole creates a rich swamp rock tapestry that propels you down the blacktop, the perfect soundtrack to go and “chase tomorrow” as Fogerty puts it in “Hey Tonight.” So the next time the highway calls you, pick a spot, pack your necessities in one of our HOLDALL no. 101 dopp kits, toss it in the trunk, crank Chronicle on the stereo and hit the road.
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Collectibles: Antique Gadget Canes

“Speak softly and carry a big stick, you’ll go far.” , Thus was the West African proverb that Teddy Roosevelt brought into the popular lexicon, but what if you’re one who tends to speak a little loudly from time to time, or find yourself involved with those that do? Well in that case, it’s probably a good idea to be carrying stick that also happens to have a sword in it. , Luckily for you, fine vintage examples of just such things are widely available, making it easy to add your belongings the rare piece that’s both deadly and dashing.

Perhaps since man took his first upright steps, the walking stick has been an essential tool, and as an accessory one wou...

read full story

“Speak softly and carry a big stick, you’ll go far.” , Thus was the West African proverb that Teddy Roosevelt brought into the popular lexicon, but what if you’re one who tends to speak a little loudly from time to time, or find yourself involved with those that do? Well in that case, it’s probably a good idea to be carrying stick that also happens to have a sword in it. , Luckily for you, fine vintage examples of just such things are widely available, making it easy to add your belongings the rare piece that’s both deadly and dashing.

Perhaps since man took his first upright steps, the walking stick has been an essential tool, and as an accessory one would be hard pressed to find anything that stayed in favor longer. Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics often depict noblemen carrying staffs, and all the way up until early twentieth century no self-respecting gent was fully dressed without his trusty cane. They were later replaced in popularity by the tightly wound umbrella, particularly in Britain, before falling out of favor altogether some time after World War II. , The walking stick served both as a mobility aid and rudimentary protection against dangers of the animal and human variety, and the embellishment of canes seems to date back almost as long as their use. More than 100 examples were found in Tutankhamen’s tomb, many of which were intricately carved and decorated. The height of fashion for walking sticks began in the 16th century, when canes made of precious metals and jewels were regularly employed by the upper classes to flaunt their wealth. Advancements in technology during the Victorian Era produced all sorts of whimsical gadgetry, a trend that extended into the production of walking sticks as well.

, Canes that served a dual purpose, with additional tools often hidden in their handles or hollowed out shafts became known as “system canes” or “gadget canes” and were most prolifically produced during the 18th and 19th centuries.,  One of the most popular uses was to house the tools of a man’s trade, with the cane acting as a sort of vertical briefcase. Known as “professional canes” amongst collectors today, these may contain the scalpels of a surgeon, the thimble and thread of a tailor, the compass of an architect, or any of hundreds of other designs.,  “City canes” were used for more leisurely pursuits, often containing concealable vices such flasks, cigars, cigarettes, snuffboxes, and gambling dice.,  A museum near his hometown in France houses the city cane of Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, the entire length of which was filled with vials of absinthe. “Outdoor canes” or “Country canes” were another popular design, doubling as fishing poles, birdcalls, camping seats, or binoculars. Yet the designs that have proven to elicit the greatest notoriety are undeniably the category known as weapon canes.

Weapon canes are one of the oldest varieties of gadget canes, tracing their roots to Japanese warriors. Over time they would house all sorts of deadly contraptions, from blow darts to shotguns to pepperbox revolvers, but the sword cane is by far the most famous.,  Sword canes were certainly made of the high end variety- daggers available at the twist of a solid gold handles and ivory “dueling canes” which held two blades of equal length lest an offended party’s opponent ever be found unprepared. But it was more rudimentary examples that made the biggest mark in history, as France at one point outlawed walking sticks in public all together after angry mobs would stab at the ankles of police horses using canes with concealed razor tips during riots. The French were also responsible for the design of one of the most infamous weapon canes, a contraption known as “Le Diabolique.” An attacker would jab le diabolique at his victim, who would instinctively grab the cane in defense. A twist of the handle would cause dozens of upward facing razor-sharp barbs to sprout from the sides, which would decimate the victim’s hands as the cane was yanked backwards. So cruel was le diabolique that it was outlawed almost immediately after introduction, and original examples are highly prized amongst collectors today.

The market for gadget canes is exceedingly vibrant, with authentic examples commanding from several hundred to tens of thousands of dollars.,  The sale of weapon canes can in some cases be illegal, though examples more than a hundred years are often exempt from such laws. A number of dealers specialize in unique examples of authentic unique canes, notably, M.S. Rau Antiques of New Orleans. And for those interested in a more modern descendant we suggest our own handcrafted Newport No. 90, which serves triple duty as a walking stick, umbrella, and freestanding sunshade.

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100 Years of Aston Martin

For those with a passion for all things automotive, - a subset to which we certainly subscribe - 2013 is a year of several important milestones. Not only is it the 50th, anniversary of Porsche’s iconic 911, it also marks the centennial of a small company born in a London garage of Lionel Martin and Robert Bamford - a company that would later be known to the world as, Aston Martin. , This year, we were fortunate to be asked to be a part of the legendary automaker's celebration at the, Pebble Beach Conco...
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For those with a passion for all things automotive, - a subset to which we certainly subscribe - 2013 is a year of several important milestones. Not only is it the 50th, anniversary of Porsche’s iconic 911, it also marks the centennial of a small company born in a London garage of Lionel Martin and Robert Bamford - a company that would later be known to the world as, Aston Martin. , This year, we were fortunate to be asked to be a part of the legendary automaker's celebration at the, Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. While often mentioned in the same breath as venerable brands Ferrari, Lamborghini, Rolls-Royce, and Bentley, there is something that has always set Aston Martin’s cars apart. Certainly there have been faster cars, rarer cars, and more expensive cars, but no marque has produced cars as consistently beautiful. While its Italian counterparts churned out cars whose outlandish designs laid bare their performance, Aston Martin has remained quintessentially British: empire-conquering power hidden beneath lines as perfectly restrained as those of a Savile Row suit. It’s no wonder that Aston Martin was the ride of choice of Bond himself. With that in mind, and to honor their centenary, we present 007 of our favorite Aston Martins of all time. 001: Aston Martin DBR-1 Just 5 examples were built as factory racers beginning in 1956, with the express goal of victory at the 24 Hours of LeMans. The car pictured here, chassis DBR1/2, would achieve just that in 1959, piloted by a young Texan by the name of Carrol Shelby. 002: Aston Martin Vantage Volante In 1982 Aston Martin received a Royal Warrant of Appointment by The Prince Of Wales, a charter that it still holds. In 1986 a convertible version of the Aston Martin Vantage, (introduced 10 years before and widely considered to be Britain’s first super car) was commissioned by Prince Charles. Only 191 other examples of the handmade open-top Volantes would be produced. 003: Aston Martin V12 Vanquish S Keeping in mind the adage that “any man can drive a straight line but it takes an expert to handle curves,” the voluptuous 2001-2007 Vanquish sports one of the greatest rear ends to ever grace the road. 004: Aston Martin DB4 Zagato Though Aston Martin engaged in a five-decade multiple-collaboration relationship with Italy’s third best known coach builder which led to some questionable designs, there is no denying the beauty of the 25 Zagato-bodied DB4s produced from 1960-1963. And while the chrome treatment of this modern sports car may on first glance appear garish, collector/racer Herb Wetanson’s stripped bare and polished aluminum 1961 example is pure automotive pornography. 005: Aston Martin Rapide With the debut of the $200,000 Rapide at the 2009 Frankfurt Auto Show, Aston Martin introduced not only a worthy competitor to the super-sedan sports car category dominated by Maserati’s Quattroporte and Porsche’s Panamera, it also gave the world its best looking 4-door car. Ever. 006: Aston Martin DBR-1 Because Racecar. Two-time 24 Hours of Le Mans champion. 007 Aston Martin DB5 No list of Aston Martins would be complete without mention of what is far and away the most famous Aston ever - James Bond’s tricked-out DB5 spy car which made its big screen debut in the 1964 blockbuster, Goldfinger. The ideal companion for a fall driving adventure in the Aston of your choice? , Our Cavalier I in Vintage Chestnut Leather. , Vroom.
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Do You Have A Story?

We would love to hear about the adventures you have had with your Ghurka Bag.

Send your stories to: stories@ghurka.com

Ghurka Features

  • Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.

  • Our Leather

    learn more

    show less

    Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    learn more

    show less

    The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    learn more

    show less

    The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    learn more

    show less

    The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.