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KILBURN II No. 156 | Vintage Chestnut Leather Suitcase

Product Code: ZZGGB156

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GHURKA BRASS

$195.00

Available in These Materials:

  • 3 1/4" Length
    • Solid Brass Plate
      • 5 Lines, 20 Characters per line

Product Features

  • 21" x 12" x 10"
    • Top zipper under flap opens wide for ease in packing
      • Side cargo handles
        • Gusseted pocket on one exterior end
          • Full length interior zippers
            • Detachable and adjustable shoulder strap

Product Tags

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Product Description

Courtesy of intelligent engineering and timeless design, our vintage black Kilburn II No. 156 silhouette of leather travel bag will elevate your expectations for what a leather suitcase should be. Achieving the ideal balance of functionality and stylish form, this leather suitcase is uniquely designed to cater to the needs of business travelers and pleasure-seeking explorers with equal proficiency. This versatility stems from its handcrafted origins in which each detail of the Kilburn II leather suitcase was purposefully chosen and individually constructed to ensure perfection. Finished with our signature leather processing, this bag is built to stand the test of time.

Product Specifications

  • 21" x 12" x 10"
    • Top zipper under flap opens wide for ease in packing
      • Side cargo handles
        • Gusseted pocket on one exterior end
          • Full length interior zippers
            • Detachable and adjustable shoulder strap

What Fits in This Bag

KILBURN II No. 156 | Vintage Chestnut Leather Suitcase

Stories

Hand Crafted: The ICON 4x4 FJ40

Here at Ghurka, we’re big fans of cars, particularly the classics. And we love a good adventure, the type that takes one off the beaten path. So great old cars that are purpose built to go on such adventures take a special spot in our hearts. We also take great pride in being craftsmen, in eschewing mass production and instead painstakingly creating by hand the finest product we possibly can, regardless of the additional time and expense, and have a great admiration for other companies that do the same. Rarely do we find things that combine all three of these passions, and even rarer that they do it as well as the ICON 4x4 FJ40. ICON 4x4 is the brainchild of Jonathan Walsh, a Californian with a particular affinity for vintage Toyota La...
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Here at Ghurka, we’re big fans of cars, particularly the classics. And we love a good adventure, the type that takes one off the beaten path. So great old cars that are purpose built to go on such adventures take a special spot in our hearts. We also take great pride in being craftsmen, in eschewing mass production and instead painstakingly creating by hand the finest product we possibly can, regardless of the additional time and expense, and have a great admiration for other companies that do the same. Rarely do we find things that combine all three of these passions, and even rarer that they do it as well as the ICON 4x4 FJ40. ICON 4x4 is the brainchild of Jonathan Walsh, a Californian with a particular affinity for vintage Toyota Land Cruisers. He owned TLC, a Land Cruiser specific restoration shop that became so well known it caught the eye of Toyota themselves, who hired Walsh as a consultant. Walsh had long sought the “ultimate” Land Cruiser, and unable to find one that met his exacting specifications, he decided to create his own. Entirely from scratch. That’s a bold undertaking regardless of the vehicle, but if any car were to be rebuilt upon and improved to perfection, there are few that would be more fitting of the treatment than the Land Cruiser, as that sort of passion is in its very DNA. To understand the Land Cruiser, one has to go back more than 60 years. America was entrenched in war with Korea, and it needed a faster and more economical way to get its Willys Jeeps to troops than building and shipping them from the States. So the army contracted Toyota, and gave them the blueprints to replicate 100 Willys Jeeps and deliver them directly to Korea. After building the cars engineers at Toyota felt convinced that they could design a similar go-anywhere vehicle that was even better than the Willys, and set out to do just that. , By 1951, their product, internally known as the BJ, would make it further up Mount Fujithan any other vehicle ever created. The BJ would be rechristened the Land Cruiser, and its most popular iteration, the FJ40 would be introduced in 1960. It was the FJ40 that Walsh particularly loved, and much like theToyota engineers half a century before with the Willys, he set out to build something that was even better. , But there was one main difference between Walsh’s ICON and the engineers in Japan is that while Toyota needed to make vehicles that were economically feasible from a business stand point, for Walsh, price was no object. The ICON just had to be perfect. To build the ICON, Walsh sourced technologies from a number of industries, bringing innovations from architecture and aeronautics into the automotive fold. The chassis and body panels are all laser cut from military strength aluminum, and the “paint” is actually a Teflon/polyester hybrid powdercoat that will never rust or fade and never requires waxing. The polarized sunshades were sourced from Lear Jets, the interior material is displayed in the Museum of Modern Art, and the windshield hardware comes from industrial grade freezers. You won’t find an inch of plastic on the ICON FJ, and any part Ward couldn’t find a suitable upgrade for he designed and machined himself. Every ICON is individually designed specifically for each customer, who can choose from over a hundred options in suspension, exhaust, electrics, and accessories, and whether they’d like a manual or automatic transmission mated to the “base” 350hp engine or be upgraded to the 420hp 5.7 liter V8. The whole design process takes several months, and everything is assembled by hand, start to finish, at ICON’s Los Angeles factory. The result is a fully bespoke vehicle that could very well be the greatest SUV in the world. There is nothing outwardly opulent about an ICON, it is a vehicle that has been stripped down to only what is absolutely necessary. But what does remain is designed and manufactured with an attention to detail that is unmatched in even the most expensive mass marketed automobiles. The ICON is also an extremely effective tool, a go anywhere vehicle that will outperform anything else is existence, and made to still be doing it a lifetime from now. This obsessive quest for perfection doesn’t come cheap- an ICON FJ40 starts around $130,000 and can easily double from there depending on the options. But what that buys you is much more than a car; it’s a rolling piece of art, a usable, tangible representation of an overwhelming passion. And it’s also pretty damn cool to boot. So what does one keep in the cargo space of an ICON FJ40? Nothing short of another rugged, handcrafted luxury item that’s built to last a life time would do, which is why we suggest our Kilburn II No. 156 in vintage chestnut leather.
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Let's Begin with No. 2

It all started with a bag - No. 2 Express. Inspired by the military campaign gear of the Ghurka officers of the early twentieth century, this style evoked the kind of rugged adventure and far-flung travel that changes a man's life forever. The success of No. 2 launched a brand that our founder Marley Hodgson called, "an inspiring, timeless collection of travel and sporting gear, ideal for both city and country." As appropriate in bucolic New England as on the African savannah, Ghurka would change the way American men set off on their own adventures. True to Marley's mission, we hope to continue to inspire our collectors through a growing range of ex...
read full story
It all started with a bag - No. 2 Express. Inspired by the military campaign gear of the Ghurka officers of the early twentieth century, this style evoked the kind of rugged adventure and far-flung travel that changes a man's life forever. The success of No. 2 launched a brand that our founder Marley Hodgson called, "an inspiring, timeless collection of travel and sporting gear, ideal for both city and country." As appropriate in bucolic New England as on the African savannah, Ghurka would change the way American men set off on their own adventures. True to Marley's mission, we hope to continue to inspire our collectors through a growing range of exciting products and editorial content that stir up the itch to explore.
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Getaways: Oheka Castle

We’d packed rather lightly- an Express No. 2 and a Cavalier II Duffel, a Holdall 101 for the overnight necessities- as we wouldn’t be traveling too far. Just 37 miles to be exact, from Ghurka’s New York City headquarters to the town of Huntington on Long Island’s North Shore. The trip itself was easy, half an hour on the L.I.E. before taking exit 45 where amongst a leafy stretch of gated subdivisions we saw a single small sign pointing us to our destination: Oheka Castle. This 17-m...
read full story
We’d packed rather lightly- an Express No. 2 and a Cavalier II Duffel, a Holdall 101 for the overnight necessities- as we wouldn’t be traveling too far. Just 37 miles to be exact, from Ghurka’s New York City headquarters to the town of Huntington on Long Island’s North Shore. The trip itself was easy, half an hour on the L.I.E. before taking exit 45 where amongst a leafy stretch of gated subdivisions we saw a single small sign pointing us to our destination: Oheka Castle. This 17-mile stretch along the Long Island Sound has been known for over a century as “The Gold Coast”, named for the concentration of wealthy New York industrialists that built sprawling country estates on large plots of land. During the gilded age some 500 mansions were commissioned there by names such as Astor, Vanderbilt, Hearst, and Whitney as testaments to their great wealth, but arguably none were grander than Oheka. At 109,000 square feet, the Chateauesque mansion was certainly the biggest, being the second largest private home in the country, bested only by Charles Vanderbilt’s Biltmore in North Carolina, which is a distinction it still holds to this day. Oheka was named after its original owner, Otto Hermann Kahn, a financier who made his fortune restructuring the companies of railroad barons, men whose level of wealth he himself would soon achieve. Kahn became so rich, and so well known for it, that the mustachioed “Mr. Monopoly” character that first appeared on the board game in 1936 is said to be based on his likeness. Having acquired some 443 acres of land in the area Kahn set out in 1914 to build his trophy estate, enlisting famed architects Delano and Aldrich to design the building and the Olmsted Brothers -whose father Frederick Law Olmsted had designed New York’s Central Park- to plan the lavish European inspired gardens. Construction took 5 years and cost the then fantastical sum of eleven million dollars and Kahn, a true socialite who was widely regarded for his wit and charm, entertained regularly at the estate until his death in 1934. While many of the grand Gold Coast estates were demolished or abandoned when the price of upkeep proved too much to bear, or have since been turned over to institutions for use as schools or museums, Oheka is one of the few that remains today much as it originally stood. It is also perhaps the only one where for a decidedly reasonable price anyone can spend a night in one of the bedrooms, which is exactly what we were there to do. From the approach it’s immediately clear that you have arrived someplace quite special. As far as curb appeal goes, a 109,000 square foot chateau and its surrounding grounds are pretty tough to beat. A guard greets you at the gate house, where you are waved down a gravel drive dotted with statuary and lined with impeccably groomed trees before passing through the porte cochere and into the motor court, where you receive your first glimpse at the sheer scale of the mansion. One enters into a grand stairway modeled after the Chateau Fontainbleau and to the check-in desk of a small office to the right. We’d just missed the official tour, given daily at 11:00 am, and therefore inquired if there would be any other opportunity to see the mansion. “Sure,” replied the gentleman at the desk “you can feel free to go anywhere that’s not locked. Explore.” What wasn’t locked turned out to be nearly everything. We wandered from magnificent room to magnificent room, all in grand scale with soaring ceilings and elaborate moldings. We were partial, as we often are, to the formal library, a thoroughly masculine room of carved wood paneling with arched windows that looked out over the fountains and gardens. Only it wasn’t wood paneled at all- one of Kahn’s great concerns when building Oheka was the ability of the house to withstand a fire, so the entire library was actually made of plaster that was intricately painted to resemble grains of wood, one of the greatest American examples of the French technique of Faux Bois. Generally the opportunity to explore such properties comes only within specifically roped off boundaries and under the eyes of watchful docents, but we were able to wander the home as if it where our own, to enter and exit from any door we chose, relax in the furniture, head out to the gardens. At times we felt we must certainly be in areas in which we shouldn’t have been, but whenever we did see a staff member we were merely met with a smile and wave. After the hour that it took just to cover the grounds we headed up to our room eager to see if the accommodations were on par with the mansion that contained them. Oheka offers 32 rooms and suites across 6 categories, and we’d opted for a Fairbanks suite, priced firmly in the middle. When we opened the door to room 402 we were thrilled to find ourselves in a lavishly appointed suite that was easily thrice the size of our Manhattan apartment. With a master bedroom, study, guest room, and spacious living and dining areas along with two marble bathrooms, all done up in elegant paneling and wallpaper that stretched to the heights of the 12 foot ceilings, it resembled not so much a hotel suite as it did a home. We would later learn this was not coincidental- at one point the plan was to turn Oheka into condominiums, and several model units were constructed. The condo plans were eventually scrapped, and the proposed units were converted into the hotel’s six suites. We called down to order a bucket of ice and two flutes of champagne, as our room had put us in the mood for celebration. We were politely informed that there was no room service, but we were welcome to borrow whatever we needed from the bar. It was another example of the odd juxtaposition of Oheka. While the surroundings were as grand as any luxury resort, a traditional five star hotel this was not. There was no army of staff to wait on guests hand and foot, rather, it was just homey. Want some champagne glasses? Sure, go grab em, there’s plenty at the bar. This theme was also apparent in some of the d©cor- while the ballroom’s bones were authentically gilded age, the tables and chairs were of the faux gilded bamboo variety popular with temporary event rentals. This can be attributed to the fact that the mansion also functions as a catering hall; Oheka covers the exorbitant maintenance costs that lead to the demise of so many grand estates of its era by being one of the most popular full service wedding venues in the region. We were discussing this paradox over a dinner of veal and wine at Oheka’s restaurant and lounge when the reason for it became suddenly, delightfully clear. In walked a gentleman dressed in the same uniform as the maintenance staff, blue jeans and a black polo shirt reading “Oheka Castle Hotel & Estate.” If he were there to change a light bulb we wouldn’t have been surprised, but instead he stopped right at our table. “Welcome,” he exclaimed in a thick New York brogue, a genuine smile spreading across his face, “I’m Gary, and this is my home.” Gary Melius comes from a hardscrabble Queens background, something he seems to take just as much pride in as the fact that this is now, indeed, his home. He found success as a real estate developer during Long Island’s boom in the late ¢â,¬Ëœ70s and early ¢â,¬Ëœ80s, and as his fortunes were improving, Oheka’s had reversed. Following Kahn’s death the estate had existed briefly under the stewardship of New York State as a retreat for sanitation workers, and then for 30 years was used to house and educate cadets as the Eastern Military Academy. The academy shuttered in 1978 and Oheka was left abandoned. By the time Melius saw the estate in 1984 it had fallen into complete disrepair- thieves and vandals had broken or removed most anything of value, not a single complete door or window remained, and there were several areas where arsonists had attempted to set it aflame. (Otto Kahn’s cautious building methods proved to be prescient, as none of the fires were able to spread.) But Gary Melius could recognize an underdog’s potential, and he purchased Oheka and its remaining 23 acres (much of the original grounds had been converted to the exclusive Cold Springs Country Club, whose golf and tennis amenities hotel guests are able to access) for $1.5 million. He then poured many, many millions more into an intensive and painstaking restoration to bring the home back original glory. Shingles for the roof were mined from the same Vermont quarry that provided them from new, more than 200 new doors and windows were commissioned, the formal gardens, long since bulldozed, were replanted based on the Olmsted brother’s original plans. Despite the impressive conditions of the estate today, Melius estimates the now thirty year long restoration to only be around 70% finished. Gary was having a party that night and kindly invited us to join. Much in the spirit of Kahn himself, Gary is a consummate host and entertains at Oheka regularly, from charitable and political fundraisers to poker nights with his friends. The party we attended featured several kegs of beers, which bartenders were pouring into silver kettles. At one point our companion coyly asked Gary if she could frolic in the fountains should she return in warmer weather, to which Gary replied “Sure thing. I just want people to have fun.” And that, in many ways, is what makes the Oheka of today so special. Yes, it is undoubtedly one of the most magnificent and historically significant estates in the country, and the scale and detail are breathtaking. Yes, it’s an incredibly unique place to spend a night, and certainly worth getting a room, (particularly the suites) for a romantic getaway. But it’s also Gary’s house, and Gary just wants you to relax and enjoy yourself. “You know me,” said Gary to a friend at one point, leaning against a chair in the 127-room mansion he and his family call home, “I’m not fancy.”
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Do You Have A Story?

We would love to hear about the adventures you have had with your Ghurka Bag.

Send your stories to: stories@ghurka.com

Ghurka Features

  • Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.

  • Our Leather

    learn more

    show less

    Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    learn more

    show less

    The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    learn more

    show less

    The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    learn more

    show less

    The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.