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NAVIGATOR NO. 286

Product Code: ZZSPB286

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Product Features

  • 21" x 10" x 11"
    • LED Flashlight
      • Tire Guage
        • Fits In Standard Glove Box

Product Tags

Use spaces to separate tags. Use single quotes (') for phrases.

Product Description

Putting the luxury into your exploration, the expert Navigator glove box kit in chestnut leather is the keystone to our automotive series. A chestnut, calfskin leather bound exterior is structured for a hard feel with a luxuriously soft touch. When opened, the full body zipper unleashes an interior with individualized compartments gracing both faces of the bi-fold design. A large pocket, tire gauge holder and LED flashlight complete one side of the leather glove box kit, while multiple card pockets and a sleek notepad balance the opposite. In the centerfold, a solid brass pen is proficiently stored for easy accessibility. Welcoming the road ahead with its powerful design and detailed organization, our Navigator is a driver's best asset.

Product Specifications

  • 21" x 10" x 11"
    • LED Flashlight
      • Tire Guage
        • Fits In Standard Glove Box

Stories

Bucket List: The Dakar Rally

If you think a flat out, off-road race from France to Senegal might be the type of thing that an adventurous playboy with a good amount of inherited money might concoct, then you’d be exactly right. , It all began when a 28-year-old Frenchman Thierry Sabine got lost on his motorbike in the Libyan desert in 1977 and decided that this was just the sort of adventure some of his well-heeled chums back in France might enjoy. So the next year, a number of his friends and associates from the racing world gathered at the base of the Eiffel Tower and began the first running of what would officially become known as the Paris Dakar Rally... and what would unofficially become known as “The Most Dangerous Race in The World”. Th...
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If you think a flat out, off-road race from France to Senegal might be the type of thing that an adventurous playboy with a good amount of inherited money might concoct, then you’d be exactly right. , It all began when a 28-year-old Frenchman Thierry Sabine got lost on his motorbike in the Libyan desert in 1977 and decided that this was just the sort of adventure some of his well-heeled chums back in France might enjoy. So the next year, a number of his friends and associates from the racing world gathered at the base of the Eiffel Tower and began the first running of what would officially become known as the Paris Dakar Rally... and what would unofficially become known as “The Most Dangerous Race in The World”. The race, which covered over 6000 miles of some of the world’s most treacherous terrain, would be open to both amateur and professional participants in any form of wheeled transport, be it car, truck, or motorcycle. , As the race's notoriety grew, a number of automobile and motorcycle companies assembled their own factory team for the rally - most famously Porsche with its 959 supercar. While changes in the both the physical and political landscape caused the route of the race to be modified several times, the rally continued to be run through Africa until 2008, when terrorist threats directed at participants crossing through Mauritania abruptly canceled the race. Since 2009 the route has been moved to South America, though keeping the Dakar name in tribute. The title of “World's Most Dangerous Race” is not without merit, as almost every year participants have been lost or killed from causes ranging from accidents to run-ins with African wildlife and warring tribesmen. The official death toll relating to the Dakar Rally stands at over 60, including Thierry Sabine himself, who perished along with four other passengers in a helicopter crash during the 1986 race. For those who remain undaunted, entry applications for the race can be submitted via www.dakar.com For our Ghurka fans who would prefer the role of spectator, stake out a spot on the sidelines with our Newport Umbrella.        
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Best of Both Worlds: Backdated Porsche 911s

In the pantheon of sports cardom, there is perhaps no single model more iconic than Porsche’s legendary 911. Much of this can be attributed to the fact that the 911 has been the 911 for so long- 50 years as of 2013 in fact. It’s a single nameplate sportscar run bested only by Chevrolet’s Corvette, the main difference being that most every generation of the 911, every “evolution” as the folks in Stuttgart like to call them, has been praised as nearly perfect. The basic platform and shape of the 911 has remained essentially unchanged, a long hooded, bubble backed 2+2 with flat six engine hanging beyond the rear axle, giving an unbalanced weigh ratio that makes handling terrifying to the uninitiated and sublime to those that hav...
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In the pantheon of sports cardom, there is perhaps no single model more iconic than Porsche’s legendary 911. Much of this can be attributed to the fact that the 911 has been the 911 for so long- 50 years as of 2013 in fact. It’s a single nameplate sportscar run bested only by Chevrolet’s Corvette, the main difference being that most every generation of the 911, every “evolution” as the folks in Stuttgart like to call them, has been praised as nearly perfect. The basic platform and shape of the 911 has remained essentially unchanged, a long hooded, bubble backed 2+2 with flat six engine hanging beyond the rear axle, giving an unbalanced weigh ratio that makes handling terrifying to the uninitiated and sublime to those that have mastered it. Advances have been made along the way, with each new evolution offering increased power and updated technology, but any Porsche 911, regardless of the year it was made, is instantly and unmistakably a 911. The cult of Porsche is strong and global, and collectors, voting with their dollars, have made it clear that two generations of 911s are considered superior to all the others. One is the model known internally as the 993, produced from 1994 to 1998 and heralded as being “the last of the air cooled” as Porsche moved to water cooled engines in their next evolution, known as the 996. The ultimate version of the 993, the Turbo S, now trades hands for north of $200k, creeping into the territory of the most valuable regularly produced 911, the infamous 1973 Carrera 2.7 RS. The other is the very first iteration of the 911, produced from 1963 until 1973. These are known in the Porsche community as a “longnose” since safety regulations in 1974 required Porsche to add external bumpers on the front and rear, shortening the length of the hood to accommodate them. These early 911s, admired for the beauty of their simplicity have become prized amongst collectors, with the price of entry tripling over the last ten years, from $20k+ to $60k+ for a decent runner. The only issue with these first 911s is that as they didn’t benefit from the advances in engineering applied to the later cars- they simply weren’t as good from a technical standpoint. Nostalgic and attractive yes, but from a practical standpoint, anti-lock brakes, power steering, better suspension, improved transmissions, and increases in horsepower genuinely made for a better car. The ideal 911 to many then would be the lines and looks of a longnose, with all of the upgrades of more modern models. This was exactly the thought process of a handful of capable enthusiasts. If the 911 chassis had essentially been the same all along, couldn’t a newer car be made to look older? After all, Porsche owners for years had been doing just the opposite, adding aftermarket body panels to the frames of older 911s to make them look like the newest models, and a quick scan of eBay motors will easily find you several 70’s and 80’s era 911s made to look like they were from the 90’s. The concept of taking cars from the 80’s and 90’s and “backdating” them to look like Porsches from the 60’s is a newer one, but one that’s quickly gained traction. The most visible of these conversions come from the shop of former rock musician Rob Dickinson’s Singer Vehicle Designs, whose “reminagined” 911s begin life as 1989-1994 964 model car before being stripped of their body panels, as well as nearly everything else, and being rebuilt as the ultimate interpretation of a longnose 911. Singer takes backdating and customization to the extreme, spending close to 4,000 hours of labor on each car. The eye-popping results have a price tag to match, oft ending up in the $300k+ range. But for those with a more realistic budget, backyard backdates can be achieved for significantly less. These generally begin as cars from the 1974-1983 era, which can be readily found for under twenty grand. All body panels other than the doors are removed, replaced with modified steel or fiberglass replicas of the original longnose parts from a growing number of small manufacturers that specialize in crafting them. The parts themselves are not terribly expensive, with the majority of the effort being in the labor of perfectly matching the original lines. But even those who wish to farm the work out to a qualified body shop can attain a basic backdated 911 with the sex appeal of the early cars and the safety and performance of later ones for a grand total of less than thirty thousand dollars. While purists may scoff at these “Frankenstein” Porsches, those with a real passion for driving can’t get enough. Just ask Achim Anscheidt, the man who designed the mighty Bugatti Veyron, the $1.2 million dollar supercar touted as the fastest in the world. His daily driver is a backdated ’81 911. We happen to be huge fans of them as well. Proven performers with rugged reliability and classic lines are the same traits we strive for when handcrafting our Express Series of bags, a pair of which happen to fit perfectly in the trunk.
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100 Years of Aston Martin

For those with a passion for all things automotive, - a subset to which we certainly subscribe - 2013 is a year of several important milestones. Not only is it the 50th, anniversary of Porsche’s iconic 911, it also marks the centennial of a small company born in a London garage of Lionel Martin and Robert Bamford - a company that would later be known to the world as, Aston Martin. , This year, we were fortunate to be asked to be a part of the legendary automaker's celebration at the, Pebble Beach Conco...
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For those with a passion for all things automotive, - a subset to which we certainly subscribe - 2013 is a year of several important milestones. Not only is it the 50th, anniversary of Porsche’s iconic 911, it also marks the centennial of a small company born in a London garage of Lionel Martin and Robert Bamford - a company that would later be known to the world as, Aston Martin. , This year, we were fortunate to be asked to be a part of the legendary automaker's celebration at the, Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. While often mentioned in the same breath as venerable brands Ferrari, Lamborghini, Rolls-Royce, and Bentley, there is something that has always set Aston Martin’s cars apart. Certainly there have been faster cars, rarer cars, and more expensive cars, but no marque has produced cars as consistently beautiful. While its Italian counterparts churned out cars whose outlandish designs laid bare their performance, Aston Martin has remained quintessentially British: empire-conquering power hidden beneath lines as perfectly restrained as those of a Savile Row suit. It’s no wonder that Aston Martin was the ride of choice of Bond himself. With that in mind, and to honor their centenary, we present 007 of our favorite Aston Martins of all time. 001: Aston Martin DBR-1 Just 5 examples were built as factory racers beginning in 1956, with the express goal of victory at the 24 Hours of LeMans. The car pictured here, chassis DBR1/2, would achieve just that in 1959, piloted by a young Texan by the name of Carrol Shelby. 002: Aston Martin Vantage Volante In 1982 Aston Martin received a Royal Warrant of Appointment by The Prince Of Wales, a charter that it still holds. In 1986 a convertible version of the Aston Martin Vantage, (introduced 10 years before and widely considered to be Britain’s first super car) was commissioned by Prince Charles. Only 191 other examples of the handmade open-top Volantes would be produced. 003: Aston Martin V12 Vanquish S Keeping in mind the adage that “any man can drive a straight line but it takes an expert to handle curves,” the voluptuous 2001-2007 Vanquish sports one of the greatest rear ends to ever grace the road. 004: Aston Martin DB4 Zagato Though Aston Martin engaged in a five-decade multiple-collaboration relationship with Italy’s third best known coach builder which led to some questionable designs, there is no denying the beauty of the 25 Zagato-bodied DB4s produced from 1960-1963. And while the chrome treatment of this modern sports car may on first glance appear garish, collector/racer Herb Wetanson’s stripped bare and polished aluminum 1961 example is pure automotive pornography. 005: Aston Martin Rapide With the debut of the $200,000 Rapide at the 2009 Frankfurt Auto Show, Aston Martin introduced not only a worthy competitor to the super-sedan sports car category dominated by Maserati’s Quattroporte and Porsche’s Panamera, it also gave the world its best looking 4-door car. Ever. 006: Aston Martin DBR-1 Because Racecar. Two-time 24 Hours of Le Mans champion. 007 Aston Martin DB5 No list of Aston Martins would be complete without mention of what is far and away the most famous Aston ever - James Bond’s tricked-out DB5 spy car which made its big screen debut in the 1964 blockbuster, Goldfinger. The ideal companion for a fall driving adventure in the Aston of your choice? , Our Cavalier I in Vintage Chestnut Leather. , Vroom.
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Great Drives: California SR-1 and 17-Mile Drive

The fact that Pebble Beach and the Monterey Peninsula became a mecca of for the upper echelon of car enthusiasts is no coincidence. Yes, the golf courses stretching along the sea certainly provide a natural beauty to enhance the flowing sheet metal of the cars, but as with most great journeys, getting there is half the fun. In tribute to another successful year co-hosting the Aston Martin Estate at Monterey Car Week, we dedicate this edition of Great Drives to the road that runs right through it- 17 Mile Drive and California State Route 1.   Driving In monterey
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The fact that Pebble Beach and the Monterey Peninsula became a mecca of for the upper echelon of car enthusiasts is no coincidence. Yes, the golf courses stretching along the sea certainly provide a natural beauty to enhance the flowing sheet metal of the cars, but as with most great journeys, getting there is half the fun. In tribute to another successful year co-hosting the Aston Martin Estate at Monterey Car Week, we dedicate this edition of Great Drives to the road that runs right through it- 17 Mile Drive and California State Route 1.   Driving In monterey   SR1, or Highway 1 as it’s commonly known- and in some areas Pacific Coast Highway- runs some 655 miles along California’s coast. While it could be picked up in any number of places that would make for memorable motoring, for this particular route we’ll start at one of our favorite places in the Golden State- the Ghurka Store at 245 Post Street in San Francisco. Though there are certainly quicker ways out of the city- Highway 80 for example- we’re suckers for the scenic, so head west along Geary until you hit the water, then south on Great Highway to Skyline Drive. Here you’ll connect to Highway 1 South, which you’ll cruise for the next one hundred miles until you hit the Monterey Peninsula. This stretch of highway encapsulates what makes residents rave about this part of California in a nutshell, the great variety of nature. A sweeping corniche offers views of the sea stretching out to the horizon on one side of you, and the state parks, mountains, and redwoods along the other. California being the cult of car culture that it is, you’re likely to be sharing the road with at least one spirited sports car- at least until it buzzes by you- but take this route around car week and you’ll come across dozens playing a delightful game of cat and mouse.   carmel by the sea   While Santa Cruz and its boardwalk may make for a tempting first stop, we like to stay right on 1 until we hit one of our favorite little towns anywhere, the delightful and aptly named Carmel-By-The-Sea. A quaint downtown of shops, cafes, galleries, and inns any time of the year, during car week it carries the added bonus of millions of dollars of collector cars parallel parked along Ocean Ave. It’s not even that they’re hosting a car show, this is just where their owners come to spend the day as well. There are a number of great places to grab lunch, from the fairytale-esque Casanova to the casual charm of Katy’s Place. And no visit to Caramel for us is ever complete without a stop at jeweler Fourtane, which never ceases to impress us with their well curated collection of vintage Rolexes and Patek Philippes.   casanova   Just at the bottom of Ocean Ave is an entrance to Seventeen Mile Drive, the legendary loop that is exactly as long as you think it would be. Maintained in many parts by the Pebble Beach Corporation, Seventeen Mile Drive connects Carmel to Monterey, while offering wonderfully winding vistas of the fairways, the sea, and the magnificent mansions that dot them both. While it’s possible the have the drive bring you back to your entry point, it’s one of those roads that’s worth driving both ways for a thoroughly enjoyable 34 miles. By now it’s likely late afternoon, so one may choose to head back along Highway 1 North for the two hour shot back to San Francisco. Or should the mood strike, there’s ample places nearby to stay. We suggest doing as the guests of Aston Martin did and checking into Relais and Chateau’s luxurious jewel box L’ Auberge, right in Carmel. After all, spontaneous overnight trips are exactly why your trunk always has a fully packed leather Cavalier II.   L'Auberge
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Do You Have A Story?

We would love to hear about the adventures you have had with your Ghurka Bag.

Send your stories to: stories@ghurka.com

Ghurka Features

  • Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.

  • Our Leather

    learn more

    show less

    Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    learn more

    show less

    The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    learn more

    show less

    The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    learn more

    show less

    The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.