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PAIRING No. 285

Product Code: ZZGGB285

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Product Features

  • Holds two bottles
  • 12.5" x 3.5" x 7.5"

Product Tags

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Product Description

Ripe from our newly launched Connoisseur Collection, the Pairing Wine Carrier offers sleek and secure transport for your prized vintage favorites. Handcrafted in the finest French calfskin leather and detailed to ensure protective carrying, our Pairing Wine Carrier allows you to sip, swirl and taste at leisure. For an evening out or an afternoon in the park, this classic accessory is the perfect pairing.

Product Specifications

  • Holds two bottles
  • 12.5" x 3.5" x 7.5"

Stories

Found on the Sound: The Barteca Restaurants

With a manufacturing home-base in southeastern Connecticut for the past 40 years, you can imagine that we've become quite familiar with the culinary scene in Fairfield county. While not the foodie paradise of the metropolis to our south, we've been quite content with the classic New England seafood stalwarts and old-world Italian establishments that have dominated the Constitution State's east coast for as long as anyone can remember. That was until Barteca Restaurant Group's Sasa Mahr-Batuz and Andy Pforzheimer entered the game.,  The celebrated chefs, world travelers, and bon vivants knew there was an appetite for something more daring along the affluent Metro N...
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With a manufacturing home-base in southeastern Connecticut for the past 40 years, you can imagine that we've become quite familiar with the culinary scene in Fairfield county. While not the foodie paradise of the metropolis to our south, we've been quite content with the classic New England seafood stalwarts and old-world Italian establishments that have dominated the Constitution State's east coast for as long as anyone can remember. That was until Barteca Restaurant Group's Sasa Mahr-Batuz and Andy Pforzheimer entered the game.,  The celebrated chefs, world travelers, and bon vivants knew there was an appetite for something more daring along the affluent Metro North New Haven corridor.,  If you've poked around the area at all, you may have taken note.,  That sexy Malibu-meets-Tulum “taco villa” on the water in Westport? Theirs.,  The raucous James Beard-winning tapas spot with the open kitchen and a $15,000 Berkel Jamon Serrano slicer?,  Also theirs.,  With a handy assist from Culinary Director Adam Halberg, the duo has served up some of the most exciting dining experiences to hit the tri-state area in the past five years. Let's start with Barcelona, the group's flagship enterprise an unassuming, award-winning Spanish and Mediterranean eatery offering the finest small plates of fresh seafood, grilled meats, and Mangialica and Patanegra varieties on the market.,  Cut on the world class Berkel slicer, the experience of ordering up a plate is one to be savored. On a recent visit to the Greenwich location, Executive Chef and Le Cirque and Joel Robuchon veteran Michael Lucente schooled us on the process. While the kitchen delivers straight culinary prowess, the bar and wait staff is another force to be reckoned with. , The wine list, developed by Wine & Spirits Director Gretchen Thomas (and expertly poured by the fearless Brandon at the bar) features the largest selections of Spanish, Portuguese, and South American wines in America. www.distcalc.info And the service team's knowledge of Galician dining is unparalleled.,  This is no accident.,  Batuz and Pforzheimer make it a point to take all staff members from chefs to servers to managers on six-day culinary tours of the menu's motherland; wine tasting in Valencia, tapas sampling in Madrid and Cuenca, and produce education on the farms of the Spanish countryside.,  These epic tasting journeys not only familiarize the team with the region, the landscape, and the ingredients, but reinforce the customs of Mediterranean hospitality: the art of casual repasts, unhurried meals, the feeling that you're dining with family. The goal is to deliver an authentic experience for patrons back home.,  These adventurous restaurateurs want to do away with what General Manager Mike Gleason calls the “technical aspects of fine dining that infect staff in the US.” Amazing?,  There is more. The team behind Barcelona recently launched a new concept with their Bartaco collection of restaurants: a cheerful, surf lodge inspired taco eatery that doubles as the best bar scene on the Long Island Sound.,  The four-outpost collection delivers to Connecticut the best of many worlds delicious, freshly prepared, and reasonably priced small dishes, and a beautiful environment filled with beautiful people.,  What more can you ask for in the middle of a trying New England winter than some surfboards and a killer Michelada? , We may not have Baja, but we have Bartaco. BARCELONA LOCATIONS Fairfield, CT Greenwich, CT New Haven, CT South Norwalk, CT Stamford, CT West Hartford, CT Atlanta, GA Brookline, MA Washington, DC BARTACO CT LOCATIONS Westport, CT Stamford, CT West Hartford, CT Port Chester, NY Very special thanks to Ria Rueda on the Barteca team for her help with this article.,  Ria, that was an evening we won't soon forget! In this story: , No. 169 Office
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The Other Kind of Horsepower: The Hampton Classic

While the equestrian sport in Europe may retain much of the popularity and glamour it has enjoyed for hundreds of years with competitions held in royal courts and palaces, here in the United States it flies far more under the radar. Yet a passionate group of domestic competitors and trainers still dedicate their lives to the sport, traveling and exhibiting throughout the year in less auspicious locations like Wellington, FL, Saugerties, NY, and Lexington, KY. However, there is one event on the American equestrian calendar each year that is greeted with the level of luxury and fanfare that the sport rightly deserves: The Hampton Classic.

Located in the tony enclave of Bridgehampton and now in its 39th year, The Hampton Classic is ...

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While the equestrian sport in Europe may retain much of the popularity and glamour it has enjoyed for hundreds of years with competitions held in royal courts and palaces, here in the United States it flies far more under the radar. Yet a passionate group of domestic competitors and trainers still dedicate their lives to the sport, traveling and exhibiting throughout the year in less auspicious locations like Wellington, FL, Saugerties, NY, and Lexington, KY. However, there is one event on the American equestrian calendar each year that is greeted with the level of luxury and fanfare that the sport rightly deserves: The Hampton Classic.

Located in the tony enclave of Bridgehampton and now in its 39th year, The Hampton Classic is taking place this week and Ghurka is proud to be a part of it, hosting a pop-up retail space right on the main show grounds. A veritable horse city is set up over many acres of prime Hamptons real estate, with some 1600 stalls being set up in various tack rooms, some of which better resemble the lobbies of 5 star lodges, as well as numerous rings for practice and competition and spectator areas. While the riders may appear all smiles as they zip from ring to ring in golf carts and mini-bikes, the shows here are serious competition. Horsemen and women of all levels will compete in a number of events of escalating skill throughout the week, all culminating in Sunday's Grand Prix with a $250,000 purse at stake.

The equestrian world is an elite one to be sure- the entirety of that grand prize wouldn't come close to the purchase price of just one of the horses on display, of which most riders have several, not to mention the hefty fees involved with training, boarding, and transporting them throughout the year. Only a handful of the many competitors will ever hope to recoup even a small portion of the costs through winnings, it is a love of the sport- and more often than not the support of their wealthy families and patrons- that keep them in the ring year after year. The VIP tent constructed each year is thus filled with a who's who of the Hamptons and beyond, the financial titans, celebrities, and socialites who gather in their finery to sip champagne amongst elegant picnic spreads while cheering on their friends and family.

Though the VIP tent may be invitation only, the rest of the show is open to the public, and is certainly worth a visit, particularly during the final Grand Prix weekend. Along with the world class show jumping itself, the Hampton Classic also features food stations from a number of Hamptons caterers, a family friendly kids area with concerts, pony rides, and a petting zoo, along with its famed retail corridor, where we'll have set up shop for the week. Make sure to stop by to tell us hello, and check out our curated collection of Ghurka goods that will keep you proper fashion.

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Pucker Up: The Story Of Mistletoe

Here at Ghurka, we unabashedly love the holidays. There’s just something about this time of the year that puts us in terrific spirits. The decorations, the carols, the sweaters, the parties, we look forward to it all. And as folks never known to shy away a kiss, stolen or otherwise, you’ll oft find us happily below the mistletoe. “The yule clog and Christmas candle were regularly burnt,” wrote Washington Irving in 1819, “and the mistletoe, with its white berries, hung up, to the imminent peril of all the pretty housewives.” Kissing under a sprig of mistletoe as a modern holiday tradition dates back at least two hundred years before, but the question that no one seems completely able to answer is why? Why does this parasit...
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Here at Ghurka, we unabashedly love the holidays. There’s just something about this time of the year that puts us in terrific spirits. The decorations, the carols, the sweaters, the parties, we look forward to it all. And as folks never known to shy away a kiss, stolen or otherwise, you’ll oft find us happily below the mistletoe. “The yule clog and Christmas candle were regularly burnt,” wrote Washington Irving in 1819, “and the mistletoe, with its white berries, hung up, to the imminent peril of all the pretty housewives.” Kissing under a sprig of mistletoe as a modern holiday tradition dates back at least two hundred years before, but the question that no one seems completely able to answer is why? Why does this parasitic, mildly poisonous plant, whose very name roughly translates to “shit stick” (Though not without reason, seeds of Mistletoe are often spread through bird droppings, leaving etymologists to believe the name comes from mist meaning dung, and tang meaning twig) obligate those passing under to offer up a pucker? The answer depends on who you ask, or specifically which culture. Mistletoe plays the strongest role amongst the tales of Norse mythology. The young god Baldur, a descendant of Thor, had premonitions that his death would come from nature, so his devoted mother Frigga went to every plant and animal and had them promise never to harm her son, forgetting to get this oath only from the mistletoe, which hides in the trees with no roots of its own. Rival god Loki found out about this and tricked Baldur’s blind brother into striking Baldur with an arrow made of mistletoe, killing him. Some stories say that his mother Frigga then asked all to embrace or kiss at the sight of mistletoe, so that its legacy would be one of love rather than sadness, while other stories go on to say that Frigga’s own tears became the plant’s white berries, which resurrected Baldur when they fell to the ground. The Druids also had ancient stories of mistletoe, which they felt had special powers as it was often attached to the sacred oak tree. And even when the oak tree would become barren in the winter, the evergreen mistletoe would retain its color, which they believed also held the spirit of the oak. This could have lead to the symbolism of the mistletoe around winter, and why we tend to bring them out this time of the year. Pliny the Elder wrote of great ceremonies involving mistletoe being clipped with golden sickles, and the connection of physical affection and mistletoe has also been attributed to the ever randy Greeks, who felt the plant contained powers of fertility. They likened the sticky white substance that surrounds mistletoe seeds to, well, we’ll let you put that one together on your own, and the golden bough of Virgil’s virile hero Aeneas was believed to be made mistletoe. Regardless of it’s historical sources the Christmas tradition of kissing under the mistletoe was alive and rampant in 17th century England, and even in the otherwise prudish Victorian era was still very much in practice, with the belief that were a Victorian woman to refuse a kiss under the mistletoe she would receive no wedding proposals the following year. But if no mistletoe is available to secure you a kiss that’s thousands of years in the making, we find a great gift will also help your chances immensely. For that we offer a full array to choose from, the history of each we’re much more sure of.
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Off With Their Heads: The Art of Sabrage

By the time this is posted it will be New Years Eve, so if you’re reading this blog regularly then a) you have fantastic taste, and b) you’re probably going to be doing some celebrating tonight. And like all great celebrations, it’s likely going to involve Champagne. Copious amounts of it. Which is why there’s no better time than tonight than to exhibit your mastery of sabrage, the act of opening of a champagne bottle with a sword. There are a number of skills that every true gentleman should have included amongst his arsenal. Some are purely practical- how to change a tire, or grill a perfect steak. Others are a mix of function and style- tying your own bow tie, banking a shot in pool. But sabrage is a skill that should be posse...
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By the time this is posted it will be New Years Eve, so if you’re reading this blog regularly then a) you have fantastic taste, and b) you’re probably going to be doing some celebrating tonight. And like all great celebrations, it’s likely going to involve Champagne. Copious amounts of it. Which is why there’s no better time than tonight than to exhibit your mastery of sabrage, the act of opening of a champagne bottle with a sword. There are a number of skills that every true gentleman should have included amongst his arsenal. Some are purely practical- how to change a tire, or grill a perfect steak. Others are a mix of function and style- tying your own bow tie, banking a shot in pool. But sabrage is a skill that should be possessed for one reason and one reason alone- because it looks awesome. The first step to successful sabrage is gathering the proper tools. The first is your blade. While an actual sword wins for style points (we’re fans of using a kukri, the traditional knives of Gurkha warriors for reasons we shouldn’t need elaborate) it isn’t a necessity. A traditional dinner knife or even a metal ruler will do- sharpness isn’t a factor, as it’s the dull side of the blade that’s used in the act. Secondly you’ll need a sealed bottle of Champagne or sparkling wine. Preferably French and of the vintage variety, not because it makes sabrage easier, but because it tastes better. This is a special occasion, and no one wants to be known as the guy who cheaped out on the bubbly. It’s a delicacy after all, and delicacies are supposed to be expensive. Due to the carbonation within, an unopened bottle of champagne naturally contains a great amount of pressure, and you are going to use this pressure to your advantage. Remove the foil from the neck completely, as well as the cage surrounding the cork. This cork, or more specifically the rim of glass around it, is now your target. And as with most successful battles, you want to strike your enemy where it is weakest. Luckily for you the spot where a bottle is quite literally the weakest is easy to find. All bottles will have a seam where the two sides were fused together. Most you will be able to find by sight alone, some will involve running your thumb around the bottle until you feel a slightly protruding ridge. Follow that ridge up the bottle until you find the place where it meets the lip of the neck. This is the exact point where you will be separating, in one fell swoop, that glass lip, cork included, from the rest of the bottle. Hold the bottle straight out from you, pointed slightly higher than parallel to the ground. Point it too low and your prized liquid will dump all over the floor, point it too high and you’ll lose precious momentum. Position the bottle so that the seam is running directly down the center. Bend your slicing elbow at a ninety degree angle, and place your blade, dull side down, firmly at the base of that seam. Then, pressing the blade strongly along the seam the entire way, extend that bent arm fully and powerfully. If done correctly, the blade will crack the bottle right where the seam meets the lip, and the internal pressure will take over from there, jettisoning the cork, rim, and a small spurt of champagne several feet into the air in one glorious fluid motion. , Once you’ve completed your sabrage immediately lift the bottle upright to decrease spillage and then distribute the champagne to your admiring onlookers, you modern day swashbuckler you. And definitely resist the urge to sip directly from your newly decapitated vessel, for as heroic as that last action may have been, that’s still broken glass, and it doesn’t belong in your mouth. Now that you know the tricks, the next step is to practice self control. Don’t go lopping the top off of every bottle you see, as there’s a fine line between slick and showing off, and the novelty loses its value. Yet for everything there is a time and place, and for the great art of sabrage there’s no better place than your New Years fete, and no better time than the stroke of midnight. Cheers to a magnificent 2014.
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Accoutrements: Antique Cigar Cutters

While we do our best in these modern times to remain health conscious, we here at Ghurka are unabashed fans of a good cigar. Almost as much as the smoke itself, we enjoy the ritual that comes with it. The storage and aging in a well seasoned humidor, the precise cut of the cap, the lighting never directly- in slow rotation over an open flame. In a world increasingly measured in nanoseconds, there’s a comfort to taking ones time and savoring an experience. Delving into cigar culture inevitably leads to the acquisition of no small number of related accessories, and as with anything involving style, it’s all about the details. Cigars have been around for hundreds of years- Columbus wrote of being presented with twisted bunches of smoki...
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While we do our best in these modern times to remain health conscious, we here at Ghurka are unabashed fans of a good cigar. Almost as much as the smoke itself, we enjoy the ritual that comes with it. The storage and aging in a well seasoned humidor, the precise cut of the cap, the lighting never directly- in slow rotation over an open flame. In a world increasingly measured in nanoseconds, there’s a comfort to taking ones time and savoring an experience. Delving into cigar culture inevitably leads to the acquisition of no small number of related accessories, and as with anything involving style, it’s all about the details. Cigars have been around for hundreds of years- Columbus wrote of being presented with twisted bunches of smoking tobacco upon his landing in Hispaniola, but the peak of their popularity in the new world was from the mid-nineteenth to early twentieth century when a cigar became a requisite accessory of any dignified male. “Gentlemen, you may now smoke,” Edward VII was said to have exclaimed whilst brandishing a cigar shortly after the passing of his infamously vice adverse mother Queen Victoria in 1901. This era also produced the largest and most elaborate variety of cigar related accoutrements, and since the cigar exists in essentially the same shape and form today as it did then, a proper antique cigar cutter is just as effective as its modern brethren, only infinitely cooler. Not long ago the enthusiast’s hunt for early tobacciana meant scouring estate sales and musty antique shops, but the advent of collectible shopping on the internet, namely eBay and more tightly curated destinations like 1stdibs have left the sophisticated smoker with little excuse for still clipping their Cohibas with the flimsy plastic giveaway cutters from their local smoke shop. While antique cigar cutters may exist in a seemingly infinite array of designs, they generally fall into three categories- pocket, hand-held, and tabletop. Pocket cutters are by far the most portable, and generally of the single or double bladed “guillotine” variety, which clip off the entire closed end, or “cap” of the cigar when squeezed together with the thumb and forefinger. High end versions made of gold, silver, or platinum with elaborate engravings or inlaid jewels are particularly prized, often with a small loop for hanging them from the pocket watch chains that were de rigueur at the time of their original manufacture. Handheld cutters tend to be about the size of a steak knife, in either scissor style with two guillotine blades or “v-cut” style, in which a thumb operated lever takes a wedge shaped slice out of the end of the cigar rather than removing the cap altogether. Handheld cutters are usually distinguished by their handles, which can be made of materials as varied as bone, ivory, tortoiseshell, and a range of precious metals or fashioned into any number of shapes. Tabletop cutters are arguably the most coveted and oft the greatest conversation piece, with many taking the form of otherwise innocuous figural sculptures with the blades and cutting mechanisms cleverly concealed within. Nautical, animal, and other sporting motifs were particularly prevalent, and more risqu© versions fashioned of the female figure have found a particular ardor amongst collectors. Seemingly every venerable luxury good maker ventured into the trade of cigar cutters, and those boasting a well known hallmark- from Cartier, Asprey, Dunhill, Hermes, et al, can easily command mid four to low five figures in today’s market. Yet the sheer volume of unique cutters produced during the cigar’s golden age means that interesting examples can be had for well under a hundred dollars with a little bit of searching.,  Fully functional and intrinsically tied to the great history of cigar culture, an antique cutter is the perfect accessory for the discerning smoker, and look best when displayed next to another prized puffing related possession, our limited edition Ghurka Partido no. 214 leather wrapped humidor.
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Hog Heaven: Jamon Iberico de Bellota

Delicacies. We must admit we’ve got a soft spot for them. Though as with most things that are rare and desirable, they tend not to come cheap. Yet, when the occasion calls for it, we can understand spending several hundred dollars on a great bottle of wine, or perhaps a bit of truffle or caviar. But twelve hundred dollars for ham? At that rate, it better be hands down the greatest ham on the entire planet- which is exactly what jamon iberico de bellota is. Most carnivorous gourmands will have at least a passing familiarity with jamon iberico, a cured ham that is oft considered Spain’s answer to Italy’s famed Prosciutto di Parma. Jamon iberico, also known as “pata negra” for the distinctive black hoof of the ...
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Delicacies. We must admit we’ve got a soft spot for them. Though as with most things that are rare and desirable, they tend not to come cheap. Yet, when the occasion calls for it, we can understand spending several hundred dollars on a great bottle of wine, or perhaps a bit of truffle or caviar. But twelve hundred dollars for ham? At that rate, it better be hands down the greatest ham on the entire planet- which is exactly what jamon iberico de bellota is. Most carnivorous gourmands will have at least a passing familiarity with jamon iberico, a cured ham that is oft considered Spain’s answer to Italy’s famed Prosciutto di Parma. Jamon iberico, also known as “pata negra” for the distinctive black hoof of the pigs that supply it, is similar to Champagne or Bordeaux in that true examples can only be produced in a specific region- in this case the southwestern corner of Spain, near the Portuguese border.,  The pigs themselves must be of the Black Iberian variety, a dark, nearly hairless breed with a genetic propensity to get very, very fat. And the majority of their short lives are spent doing just that.,  From birth the pigs are fed a regular diet of corn and grain, and then allowed to roam the Spanish countryside foraging grasses and roots, and generally weigh two hundred plus pounds after the first year. This is the end of the line for a pig destined for your “normal” jamon iberico, which sells for a comparatively paltry fifty dollars a pound. But for those pigs destined to be jamon iberica de bellota, this is where the transformation begins that will end up with a meat commanding twice the price. In the early fall, these chosen pigs begin are released into oak forests called dehesas where they will feed for four to six months. During this period, known as the Montanera, the pigs will gain up to a pound and a half a day, eventually doubling in weight. Their diet during this time consists of one thing and one thing only; the bellota, or acorn. These acorns are also the reason that the meat of these particular pigs become so special. After slaughter, referred to by Spanish farmers as the sacrifice, the front and hindquarters are packed in sea salt and after a few weeks, hung to cure. The curing process usually takes at least three years, during which the high dose of antioxidants from the acorns turns the layers of fat within the muscle to oleic acid, the “good” type of fat most regularly associated with olive oils. The result is meat that melts in the mouth, almost sweet at first with earthy afternotes of the acorn. Most of the fat that does not become oleic acid melts away during the extended in curing and the final result is a dark red, almost purple ham with elaborate golden marbling, which is served sliced thin and always cut by hand.,  It can also claim the title of the only pork that may actually be good for you, shown to lower harmful cholesterols. Until recently, those here in the United States who wished to sample the world’s most decadent ham had to embark on a journey or turn to the black market- the USDA outlawed the importation of jamon iberico until December 2007, with the first bellota varieties arriving the following year. Nowadays, it is accessible to most anyone with a cultured palate and deep pockets. In New York, it is a regular menu item at restaurants like Pata Negra and Boqueria, or can be purchased at Spanish speclalty market Despana or online anywhere from latienda.com. While twelve hundred dollars may still seem an outlandish price to pay for a ham, you’ll realize after one bite that it is truly something spectacular. And at roughly the same price and with similar care in creation, our handcrafted chestnut leather Examiner no. 5 which will last you a lifetime and beyond is practically a bargain.
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Classic Mahogany Runabouts

As world exploration is one of our major pursuits, and said world is some 70% percent water, it should come as little surprise that we’re big fans of boats. , We love all varieties, from megayachts to racing sloops to the simple jon boat. Our favorite type of vessel however is also one of our favorite combination of words - the pleasure craft. , A pleasure craft, as the name implies, serves no greater purpose than to provide its owner with an enjoyable day on the water. , And while pleasure crafts come in many designs and sizes, there may be none more classic than the mahogany runabout, the quintessential gentleman’s powerboat. The introduction of the outboard motor in the early twentieth century made speedboats an inc...
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As world exploration is one of our major pursuits, and said world is some 70% percent water, it should come as little surprise that we’re big fans of boats. , We love all varieties, from megayachts to racing sloops to the simple jon boat. Our favorite type of vessel however is also one of our favorite combination of words - the pleasure craft. , A pleasure craft, as the name implies, serves no greater purpose than to provide its owner with an enjoyable day on the water. , And while pleasure crafts come in many designs and sizes, there may be none more classic than the mahogany runabout, the quintessential gentleman’s powerboat. The introduction of the outboard motor in the early twentieth century made speedboats an increasingly popular recreation. , By the 1920’s a number of American manufacturers were handcrafting small, lightweight boats of heavily varnished wood in sizes between fifteen and thirty-two feet. The original was the Hacker-craft made by the Hacker Boat Company owned by famed naval architect John L. Hacker, who invented the v-shaped hull that allowed him to claim the title of world’s fastest boat. Rival speedboat builder Christopher Columbus Smith got into the runabout game as well, manufacturing what would soon be known as Chris-Craft. The boats took many cues from the burgeoning automobile industry, with their tufted bench seating, chrome dials, and steering wheels which allowed the pilot to sit at the front of the boat. Runabouts soon became the preferred toys of the elite, with Hacker and Chris-Craft commissioning examples for Astors, Vanderbilts, Rockefellers, William Randolph Hearst and Henry Ford. The Great Depression slowed sales considerably, and compounded by the lack of materials due to requisitions for World War II, the runabout’s popularity waned considerably towards the mid century. However postwar prosperity and the ability to cut the cost of manufacturing through new technologies brought about a second boom, and by the 1950’s Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, and Katherine Hepburn were all owners of Chris-Crafts. In Italy, Cantieri Riva was creating wooden runabouts with a distinctly European flair, and in the 1960’s any self-respecting jet-setter considered a mahogany Riva an essential element of la dolce vita. Of his summer spent courting Brigitte Bardot around the Riviera in 1968, legendary playboy Gigi Rizzo recalled “A few hours sleep were sufficient, only to begin all over again. And at the moorings always a Riva ready to welcome us.” The development of lighter weight more advanced materials such as fiberglass brought about great changes in boatbuilding, and by the late 1970’s wooden powerboats were seen as something of a relic. Yet no matter how much faster, lighter, and stronger these new boats may be, none can match the aesthetic appeal of high gloss mahogany. Luckily for those who appreciate the timeless originals, there are many options for procuring your own classic runabout. A dedicated community of enthusiasts has taken to restoring the originals, and the collector’s market is full of vintage models that are just as seaworthy as the day they were delivered. The current iteration of the Chris-Craft and Riva companies both offer models with design cues that hearken the early models that made their nameplates famous, albeit with all the modern advancements.,  And for those who want the best of both worlds (a brand new boat with all the charms of a classic runabout) look no further than upstate New York, where the Hacker Boat Company continues to handcraft all mahogany Hacker-Crafts the exact same way they have for the past hundred years. Regardless of your choice of vessel, our, Market Bag, is a perfect choice for a day on and off of the water.
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Do You Have A Story?

We would love to hear about the adventures you have had with your Ghurka Bag.

Send your stories to: stories@ghurka.com

Ghurka Features

  • Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.

  • Our Leather

    learn more

    show less

    Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    learn more

    show less

    The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    learn more

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    The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

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    The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.