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TIMEKEEPER No. 213

Product Code: ZZITA213

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Product Features

  • 10" x 7" x 3.75"
    • Removable watch forms
      • Combination dial lock
        • Accommodates 55mm watches

Product Tags

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Product Description

The gentleman's favorite accessory deserves an equally handsome home. Our chestnut leather watch case, The Timekeeper No. 213, protectively cares for your wrist-wear using the finest quality of materials, innovative design, and expert craftsmanship.

Product Specifications

  • 10" x 7" x 3.75"
    • Removable watch forms
      • Combination dial lock
        • Accommodates 55mm watches

Stories

Pucker Up: The Story Of Mistletoe

Here at Ghurka, we unabashedly love the holidays. There’s just something about this time of the year that puts us in terrific spirits. The decorations, the carols, the sweaters, the parties, we look forward to it all. And as folks never known to shy away a kiss, stolen or otherwise, you’ll oft find us happily below the mistletoe. “The yule clog and Christmas candle were regularly burnt,” wrote Washington Irving in 1819, “and the mistletoe, with its white berries, hung up, to the imminent peril of all the pretty housewives.” Kissing under a sprig of mistletoe as a modern holiday tradition dates back at least two hundred years before, but the question that no one seems completely able to answer is why? Why does this parasit...
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Here at Ghurka, we unabashedly love the holidays. There’s just something about this time of the year that puts us in terrific spirits. The decorations, the carols, the sweaters, the parties, we look forward to it all. And as folks never known to shy away a kiss, stolen or otherwise, you’ll oft find us happily below the mistletoe. “The yule clog and Christmas candle were regularly burnt,” wrote Washington Irving in 1819, “and the mistletoe, with its white berries, hung up, to the imminent peril of all the pretty housewives.” Kissing under a sprig of mistletoe as a modern holiday tradition dates back at least two hundred years before, but the question that no one seems completely able to answer is why? Why does this parasitic, mildly poisonous plant, whose very name roughly translates to “shit stick” (Though not without reason, seeds of Mistletoe are often spread through bird droppings, leaving etymologists to believe the name comes from mist meaning dung, and tang meaning twig) obligate those passing under to offer up a pucker? The answer depends on who you ask, or specifically which culture. Mistletoe plays the strongest role amongst the tales of Norse mythology. The young god Baldur, a descendant of Thor, had premonitions that his death would come from nature, so his devoted mother Frigga went to every plant and animal and had them promise never to harm her son, forgetting to get this oath only from the mistletoe, which hides in the trees with no roots of its own. Rival god Loki found out about this and tricked Baldur’s blind brother into striking Baldur with an arrow made of mistletoe, killing him. Some stories say that his mother Frigga then asked all to embrace or kiss at the sight of mistletoe, so that its legacy would be one of love rather than sadness, while other stories go on to say that Frigga’s own tears became the plant’s white berries, which resurrected Baldur when they fell to the ground. The Druids also had ancient stories of mistletoe, which they felt had special powers as it was often attached to the sacred oak tree. And even when the oak tree would become barren in the winter, the evergreen mistletoe would retain its color, which they believed also held the spirit of the oak. This could have lead to the symbolism of the mistletoe around winter, and why we tend to bring them out this time of the year. Pliny the Elder wrote of great ceremonies involving mistletoe being clipped with golden sickles, and the connection of physical affection and mistletoe has also been attributed to the ever randy Greeks, who felt the plant contained powers of fertility. They likened the sticky white substance that surrounds mistletoe seeds to, well, we’ll let you put that one together on your own, and the golden bough of Virgil’s virile hero Aeneas was believed to be made mistletoe. Regardless of it’s historical sources the Christmas tradition of kissing under the mistletoe was alive and rampant in 17th century England, and even in the otherwise prudish Victorian era was still very much in practice, with the belief that were a Victorian woman to refuse a kiss under the mistletoe she would receive no wedding proposals the following year. But if no mistletoe is available to secure you a kiss that’s thousands of years in the making, we find a great gift will also help your chances immensely. For that we offer a full array to choose from, the history of each we’re much more sure of.
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Time and Space: The Omega Speedmaster

While a previous post was dedicated to our love for the Rolex that climbed Mt. Everest, today we look at another one of our favorite watches, and one that made an even more impressive trek: the Omega Speedmaster Professional, the first watch worn on the moon. While the 1969 moonwalk is the event most associated with Omegas in orbit, their involvement in the space program, official or otherwise, actually goes back some years before. , Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarian’s orbit of the earth in April 1961 asserted the USSR’s early lead in what became known as the “Space Race”, and President Kennedy urged NASA to get an Ameri...
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While a previous post was dedicated to our love for the Rolex that climbed Mt. Everest, today we look at another one of our favorite watches, and one that made an even more impressive trek: the Omega Speedmaster Professional, the first watch worn on the moon. While the 1969 moonwalk is the event most associated with Omegas in orbit, their involvement in the space program, official or otherwise, actually goes back some years before. , Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarian’s orbit of the earth in April 1961 asserted the USSR’s early lead in what became known as the “Space Race”, and President Kennedy urged NASA to get an American into space, which they accomplished three weeks later with Alan Shepard in the first of the single-passenger Mercury space flights. In October 1962, American astronaut Wally Schirra completed what was at that point the longest of the Mercury missions at more than 9 hours. Though a timepiece was not then part of the official NASA equipment, Schirra had worn throughout the flight his own personal wristwatch, an Omega Speedmaster. Schirra reported to NASA engineers that his Speedmaster had continued to function perfectly throughout the orbit, which only served to reinforce the conclusions NASA had already begun to draw on the outer world worthiness of this particular Swiss watch.,  Documents show that as early as 1961, NASA workers began visiting jewelry stores in the Houston area and discreetly purchasing over the counter a number of watches to subject to rigorous testing. There were a few basic criteria- the watch had to be a chronograph, should it need to be used as a backup for the crucial on-board timing systems, and they needed to be manually wound due to the belief, since disproven, that automatic watches, which operate on a pendulum system which uses gravity to keep them wound, would cease to function properly outside of Earth’s gravitational pull. Along with the Omega, chronographs from Longines, Wittnauer, and Rolex were acquired for the experiments. The battery of tests included extended exposure to extreme temperatures, ranging from 0 to 200 degrees Farenheit, vacuum chamber tests to simulate zero gravity and extreme pressure situations, and a special machine created to subject each watch to intensely violent vibrations. In the end, only one of the watches was found capable of withstanding all of the conditions- the Omega Speedmaster. In March of 1965 the Omega was officially considered “flight-qualified by NASA for all manned space missions” and two Speedmasters were issued as required equipment to each member of the upcoming Gemini space missions. The first official trip into space for the Speedmaster, on a specially made extended Velcro strap, was on the arms of Gus Grissom and John Young in the Gemini III. Six weeks later Ed White would exit Gemini IV to take the first ever “spacewalk” and after photos were published which clearly showed his Omega strapped outside his suit while floating in the abyss, Omega began adding the word “Professional” below Speedmaster on the dial to let buyers know this was indeed the same watch that had made it into space. Though by the time Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin would make their moon landing in 1969 Omega would already be using the less expensive and more accurate caliber 861 movement, the Speedmaster Professionals that were issued to the astronauts were last purchased by NASA two years prior, so it is believed that it was actually the caliber 321 movement that was the “real” moon watch. And while Armstrong may famously have been the first one out of Apollo 11, it was Aldrin’s Speedmaster that was actually first on the moon. Some of the onboard timing mechanisms had indeed begun to malfunction while in orbit, so Armstrong decided to leave his Omega inside the capsule so they would always have at least one reliable chronograph aboard should exposure to the moon’s surface adversely affect the function of the watch. Yet as the testing had predicted, Aldrin’s Speedmaster continued to function flawlessly throughout the moonwalk. While Aldrin’s Omega would easily be one of the most valuable watches to collectors today it unfortunately disappeared a year later, presumed stolen along with some of Aldrin’s other personal artifacts that were destined for the Smithsonian. The watch would also play a crucial role in another famous space mission, that of the ill-fated Apollo 13. After an oxygen tank explosion forced the crew to turn off almost all electrical equipment in order to preserve enough power to make it back to earth, the astronauts had to manually fire their thrusters at exactly the right moments for exactly the right lengths of time in order to stay on course. The tools they used to assure the precision of these lifesaving methods? Their standard issue Omega Speedmaster Professionals caliber 321. American watchmaker and Omega rival Bulova was eager to get a share of the fame and success that association with the space program had brought to their competitor, and did everything they could to rally the US Government to make their own watches the standard equipment for future spaceflights. As the final Apollo space mission in 1972 approached, Bulova gained some traction by referencing the “Buy American Act” a 1933 piece of legislature that stated the government must give preference to US made products in any purchases made using federal funds. Bulova was given a chance to present an alternative to the Speedmaster, and specially made 16 different models to present to NASA for testing. As the Buy American Act stipulated that 51% of the product must be made or assembled in America, Omega in turn had their cases manufactured by the Starr Watch Case Company of Michigan which were then assembled and inspected by American watchmaker Hamilton before the watch was sent to Switzerland where the movement was added, thus still qualifying for inclusion under the Act. Another series of rigorous tests were administered and none of the 16 Bulovas were found to be as capable as the American-cased Omegas, which were again ordered for the remainder of the program. When the first handshake in space took place between Soviet Cosmonauts and American Astronauts in 1975, Omega Speedmaster Professionals were on the wrists of both of the crews. Omega has long since traded on the fact that their Speedmaster was the first watch on the moon, inscribing exactly that on all of their casebacks from 1969 onwards and issuing a litany of commemorative editions. Yet collectors are partial to the exact watches that would have actually gone into space, and Speedmasters produced prior to 1969 have been given the retronym “premoon”.,  Considering that an original caliber 321 from the early to mid sixties can in some cases be had for even less money than the recent faithful reissues that sell new for around $5000, the genuine premoon Speedy is the one you want in your chestnut leather, Ghurka TIMEKEEPER No. 213 Watch Case.
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Ghurka favorites: The Rolex Explorer

  While it can be argued that in the age of smartphones a reliable watch is no longer a necessity, we believe this is one more reason you should have one on your wrist, and it should probably be a good one. , Along with being an amazing piece of machinery (and the only piece of jewelry many men will ever sport) a proper mechanical wristwatch is an elegant throwback to an analog era. It’s also something that will last forever, so if you don’t have one you’ve inherited from your own father at a milestone moment in your life, it’s fine time to start the tradition. We’re partial to vintage watches. , As with classic cars they’re just infinitely cooler, though luckily they’re less expensive to maintain. , ...
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  While it can be argued that in the age of smartphones a reliable watch is no longer a necessity, we believe this is one more reason you should have one on your wrist, and it should probably be a good one. , Along with being an amazing piece of machinery (and the only piece of jewelry many men will ever sport) a proper mechanical wristwatch is an elegant throwback to an analog era. It’s also something that will last forever, so if you don’t have one you’ve inherited from your own father at a milestone moment in your life, it’s fine time to start the tradition. We’re partial to vintage watches. , As with classic cars they’re just infinitely cooler, though luckily they’re less expensive to maintain. , There are few better places to start than with a Rolex. , While the venerable Swiss brand needs little introduction, the various models which make up its history are a much more complex subject. , In general, they break down into two categories: Dress watches - the Dates, Datejusts, Day-Dates, and Oyster Perpetuals often seen under suits in any combination of steel and gold, and what are known as “Tool” or sport watches. , It's these Tool watches that have captured the interest of the most fervent collectors, as their histories are often as interesting and complex as the gears that make up their movements. , Rolex's four most famous tool watches were made for very distinct purposes. , The GMT was made for flying, the Daytona for racing, the Submariner for diving, and the Explorer for, well, exploring. As Ghurka embraces exploration of all sorts, we’re particular fans of the latter. The Explorer was specifically designed, to be a rugged watch that could withstand all sorts of conditions, and earned its title when it was worn by members of Sir Edmund Hillary’s team when they first summited Mt. Everest in 1953. While most of Rolex’s other tool watches are somewhat chunky, the Explorer is quite subtle, measuring at the 36mm typical of most Rolex dress watches, as opposed to the 40mm of their sportier cousins. It is most recognizable by having just the “3” “6” and “9” marked by Arabic numerals on the dial, with a triangle marking the 12, as well as it’s “Mercedes” hour hand. Explorers have recently been seen on the wrists of Matt Damon, Tom Hanks, and Brad Pitt. , Bernie Madoff’s was infamously auctioned off with the proceeds going to his victims. Don Draper was also shown sporting a 1960’s Explorer in the fourth season of Mad Men, and Ian Fleming once wrote that James Bond’s Rolex was an Explorer, likely a nod to the author's own 1954 model. Surprisingly, Explorers still represent a relative bargain in the vintage watch world. While many early Rolexes can easily pull in thirty thousand dollars or more, a little reseseach can yield a gem of an Explorer for just a tenth of that. , Though with one important model recently selling at auction for $182,000, those days may soon be behind us. Regardless, it’s still the perfect sort of thing to keep safe on your bedside table in, our suede-lined Raj Box.
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Do You Have A Story?

We would love to hear about the adventures you have had with your Ghurka Bag.

Send your stories to: stories@ghurka.com

Ghurka Features

  • Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.

  • Our Leather

    learn more

    show less

    Our Leather

    Ghurka leather is never pretreated to remove any flaws, we must begin by using the most naturally flawless hides available. While we utilize a variety of leather types based on which is best suited to a particular product, the majority of our goods are made from French calfskin. Calfskin has a finer grain and softer feel than traditional cowhide as the younger age of the animal brings less exposure to the harsh elements, the main cause of imperfection. French calfskin in particular is considered the finest in the world due to the fact that farms in France do not use barbed wire, one of the leading causes of mars and scratches. As no two skins are completely alike, each and every handcrafted leather Ghurka product will have an individual character that adds to its unique patina as it ages.

  • The Stitching

    learn more

    show less

    The Stitching

    We use an extra-thick spun nylon that should never snap or fray, and all of our craftsmen ensure that each and every piece is stitched to our exacting standards. A careful review of any two parts of a Ghurka leather luggage piece will reveal exactly the same number of stitches per inch, a requirement for anything that leaves our workshop. The placement of these stitches is equally exact, precisely laid out to the millimeter to ensure that every bit of leather is assembled to last a lifetime.

  • The Brass

    learn more

    show less

    The Brass

    Brass is the only metal we've found that offers the strength, durability, and reliability that have become our hallmark. Every single piece of our hardware - from zippers, buckles, and hooks to the smallest of snaps and rivets are made solely from this rugged and beautiful material. A great deal of time and expense has been invested in perfecting our brass zippers. Every single tooth is individually machined and polished to ensure flawless operation after years of continuous use. And since all of our leather briefcase and leather travel bag hardware is solid brass and never plated, it too will develop a unique character and patina as it ages alongside our famous leather.

  • The Process

    learn more

    show less

    The Process

    Since our founding, Ghurka has set out to manufacture the highest handcrafted leather goods available in the U.S. This has always begun with using only the finest hides in the world. While there are endless varieties of leather available, only a handful pass the rigorous selection process required to bear the Ghurka medallion. Likewise, our signature solid brass hardware and trademark stitching process ensure that our bags deliver an unparalleled owner experience and lifetime of use.